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Energy Tomorrow Blog

IEA: Opportunity for U.S. Energy as Global Demand Grows

iea  energy demand  us energy  exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 15, 2017

IEA’s statement above is remarkable. What it means is that the energy security goals U.S. leaders have discussed for more than 40 years appear to be coming into view. Thanks to modern, data analytics-based exploration and production, the United States will produce natural gas and oil at unprecedented levels, decreasing oil imports and growing opportunities for U.S. energy in the global marketplace. 

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Hurricane Update: Three things you need to know about claims of fuel price gouging

florida  gasoline demand  gasoline supply  hurricane-harvey  hurricane-irma  hurricane response  refineries  retail price 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 8, 2017

With Hurricane Irma threatening Florida, here are three things you need to know related to claims of fuel price gouging:

1. Industry Does Not Condone Price Gouging
2. Gasoline Stations are largely owned by mom-and-pop retailers
3. Supply and Demand Influences Prices

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Growing Energy Needs Drive Supply Decisions

news  energy demand  global production  shale energy  lng  renewable fuel standard  fuels 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 12, 2015

Wall Street Journal Low oil prices and economic growth have helped drive up consumer demand for energy across the world in 2015, the International Energy Agency said Thursday, a phenomenon seen from U.S. gasoline stations to Chinese auto dealerships.

The IEA’s closely watched oil-market report lent some support to an idea pushed by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and other producers: that collapsing oil prices would spur more consumer demand and eventually send prices back up. The benchmark U.S. oil price hit a six-month high on Wednesday.

The IEA said world demand for oil would increase by 1.4 million barrels a day this year, 300,000 barrels a day faster than it previously forecast, to a daily average of 94 million barrels this year. Global demand in 2014 was about 92.6 million barrels a day, the IEA said.

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E85: Fill ‘Er Up and Up and Up and …

e85  renewable fuel standard  ethanol  fuel economy  fuel demand  consumers  epa 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 18, 2014

Check out our new cartoon, which pokes fun at what actually is pretty big drawback with E85, the fuel containing up to 85 percent ethanol that some think is key to salvaging the flawed Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).   

Sure, it’s a cartoon. But it helps illustrate a real dilemma with E85 – its significant fuel economy disadvantage compared to the E10 fuel that’s the staple of the U.S. fuel supply.

Basically, because ethanol is less energy-dense than gasoline, fuel that’s up to 85 percent ethanol gets fewer miles per gallon than fuel that’s only 10 percent ethanol. Here’s a sample search from the Energy Department’s fuel economy comparison tool, which shows this in specific vehicle types – fewer mpg with E85, higher average annual fuel costs. 

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Understanding the Benefits of Trade

trade  exports  crude oil demand  lng exports  access  job creation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 26, 2013

Though there are compelling, Economics 101-type reasons the U.S. should lift its dated ban on crude oil exports and help clear the way for the export of U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG), opponents of both continue to misunderstand the way global energy markets work – as well as the significant benefits accruing to the United States from free trade.

You’ve probably heard the rhetoric: Keep American oil and natural gas locked up here at home for U.S. consumers.

This misses the essential fact that crude oil is traded (and priced) globally, and that limiting LNG exports will only limit U.S. participation in an important, developing market – while effectively denying our country the infusion of overseas wealth in exchange for valuable American commodities.

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Energy in 2014 and Beyond

energy supply and demand  access  trade  electricity  oil and natural gas development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 13, 2013

There’s much to mine from ExxonMobil’s 2014 energy outlook, but here’s a quick analysis: In a world of increasing energy demand, the future looks brightest for countries that have significant energy reserves, modern industries that can find and produce from those reserves and policies that allow them to be major players in the global marketplace. For the United States that would be check, check and … check back later.

ExxonMobil’s William Colton and Kenneth Cohen highlighted the annual report that looks to global energy demand and supply out to the year 2040. Key projections and charts:

Demand – The world’s energy demand is expected to increase 35 percent over 2010 levels by 2040. Most of the demand growth will come from the developing world. ExxonMobil projects flat demand growth in developed nations despite expanding economies due to technology and energy-use efficiencies.

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World Energy Outlook

energy development  energy demand  iea  domestic energy development  access  oil production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 3, 2013

International Energy Agency (IEA) Chief Economist Fatih Birol was at CSIS this week, highlighting the organization’s findings in its 2013 World Energy Outlook. The report focuses on global energy demand growth, the future energy mix and the sources of energy. Key takeaways from Birol’s presentation:

  • The United States could become the world’s leading oil producer as early as 2015, two years earlier than IEA projected a year ago, Birol said.
  • About two-thirds of the growth in global energy demand between now and 2035 will come from Asia.
  • U.S. energy production, especially surging natural gas output from shale via hydraulic fracturing, is creating energy cost differentials that make American products more competitive in the global market.

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Crude Oil Demand, Gasoline Prices and Greater Energy Self-Sufficiency

supply  prices  gasoline  energy  demand  crude oil  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 22, 2013

Gasoline prices have been climbing. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports:

The average U.S. retail price for regular motor gasoline has risen 45 cents per gallon since the start of the year, reaching $3.75 per gallon on February 18. Between January 1 and February 19, the price of Brent crude, the waterborne light sweet crude grade that drives the wholesale price of gasoline sold in most U.S. regions, rose about $6 per barrel, or about 15 cents per gallon.

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ExxonMobil Outlook: Matching Energy Supplies With Rising Global Demand

oil sands  hydraulic fracturing  energy policy  energy demand  access  natural gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 11, 2012

ExxonMobil has released its annual long-term energy outlook, projecting global energy needs and supplies out to 2040. Some highlights:

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