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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Natural Gas: The Global Fuel of Choice

natural gas  eia  iea  emission reductions  global energy demand 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted March 26, 2019

Natural gas is playing a lead role in meeting rapidly increasing global energy demand, and its growing use in electricity generation has resulted in significant savings in carbon dioxide emissions worldwide. These points were echoed by the International Energy Agency (IEA) in its Global Energy and CO2 Status Report released this week.

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Oil, Natural Gas as Energies Today and Tomorrow

oil and natural gas  energy outlook  eia  us energy security  air quality 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 15, 2017

Putting together three big takeaways from EIA's report, the ongoing U.S. renaissance in natural gas and oil production puts America in a strong position for the future, especially in the context of rising world energy demand. Continued growth in domestic natural gas and oil production offers the U.S. a chance to grow in its energy self-sufficiency. 

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U.S. Energy Outlook: Growing Output, Growing Security

oil and natural gas  us energy security  oil imports  energy exports  eia forecast 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 6, 2017

Sometime in the mid-2020s, U.S. energy officials project, two key lines measuring energy imports and exports will cross, and the United States will have achieved something quite special – the advent of an era in which America is a net energy exporter. That’s one of the big projections contained in the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s newly released Annual Energy Outlook for 2017 (AEO2017).

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Crude Exports and Consumer Benefits

crude oil exports  gasoline prices  consumers  domestic oil production  eia 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 9, 2016

Looking back, the weight of scholarship and analysis had predicted that, rather than cause higher pump prices here at home as some claimed, exporting domestic crude would put downward pressure on U.S. gasoline prices. In fact, that’s what we’re seeing – abundant crude oil supply benefiting American consumers. U.S. crude exports are part of that market dynamic – while also helping to support domestic production and strengthening America’s balance of trade.

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Energizing New Jersey

new jersey  refinieries  eia  vote4energy  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 8, 2016

The United States is the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas – a fact that reflects energy production in so many of the individual states. At the same time, as an energy nation every single state is involved in the broad, economically beneficial energy supply chain. Over the next few weeks we’ll take a look at the 50 states of energy, including their energy use profiles and specific energy issues in each state. Today we start with – New Jersey.

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A Look at Energy Projections and Polls

oil and natural gas  us energy security  climate  economic growth  eia 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 24, 2016

Let’s spend a few words supporting the work of the folks at the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) – which compiles energy data and produces reports that depict America’s current energy picture, as well as projections on how that picture could look years from now. EIA’s analyses are valuable for policymakers, energy-associated industries, a range of business sectors and regular Americans.

Unfortunately, EIA is taking criticism from some quarters because its reports, such as the Annual Energy Outlook 2016, project that fossil fuels will continue to be the largest piece of the U.S. energy portfolio well into the future. A number of critics want EIA to issue projections that are more optimistic about the use of renewables. ...

While predicting things is tricky, it looks like EIA’s 2000 projection for 2015 turned out to be pretty accurate for petroleum/other liquids and renewables.

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Fueled by Oil and Natural Gas – Now and in the Future

oil and natural gas development  access  eia forecast  imports  economic growth  shale energy  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 14, 2015

The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) new Annual Energy Outlook for 2015 contains a number of stats, charts and projections, but you could boil them down to a couple of important points.

First, oil and natural gas are and will continue to be the foundation of an all-of-the-above energy approach that’s key to continued U.S. economic growth, energy security and overall security. EIA says oil (36 percent) and natural gas (27 percent) supply 63 percent of America’s energy now, and EIA projects they will supply 62 percent in 2040 (oil 33 percent and natural gas 29 percent). This is because oil and natural gas are high in energy content, portable and reliable. They’re the workhorse fuels of the broader economy, making modern living possible as fuels and as the building blocks for a number of products Americans depend on every day. America is and will be dependent on a variety of energies, but oil and natural gas are and will play leading roles.

The great news is the U.S. is in the midst of a revolution in domestic oil and natural gas production, leading to a second big takeaway from EIA’s report – that domestic output is and will continue to reduce U.S. dependence on imported energy.

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Forecasting and Our Energy Reality

eia forecast  renewable energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 25, 2013

A few words of support for Adam Sieminski and his professional team at the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). When it comes to collecting data about our energy past, analyzing trends and projecting future energy supply and demand, no one does it better than EIA. Which is why reported grousing over EIA’s forecasts for renewable energy raise an eyebrow, or two.

POLITICO picks up on the grousing in Sieminski’s response to an earlier letter from some groups, in which it’s clear some in the environmental community are concerned that EIA’s renewable projections are lower than recent growth trends. Again, from Sieminski’s response, some have suggested that EIA’s projections haven’t been grounded in science.

EIA has a reputation for calling them as it sees them, so the complaint is a little surprising

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What Energy Progress Looks Like

oil sands  natural gas  keystone xl  energy  eia forecast  domestic energy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 26, 2012

Interesting piece by the Washington Post’s Robert Samuelson, analyzing America’s energy future in light of new government figures showing increased domestic oil and natural gas production:

“Despite big gains in energy efficiency and increases in ‘renewables’ (wind, solar, biofuels), fossil fuels will remain the mainstay of America’s energy system for years. In 2010, fossil fuel represented 83 percent of U.S. energy consumption, with oil at 37 percent, natural gas at 25 percent and coal at 21 percent. Although total energy use grows only 10 percent between 2010 and 2035, the fossil-fuel share stays high at 77 percent in 2035. Oil is 32 percent, natural gas 25 percent and coal 20 percent.”

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