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Energy Tomorrow Blog

EPA's Missed Opportunity with Proposed OOOOa Amendments

emission reductions  methane  production  standards  epa 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted November 14, 2018

The good news is that EPA’s proposed amendments to the 2016 New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) OOOOa rule will continue the rule’s ability to effectively reduce volatile organic compound and methane emissions from all emission sources addressed in the previous administration’s rule. Methane is the primary component of natural gas – a key product for industry. Producers are incentivized to bring that product to consumers, making its capture a top priority from a business standpoint, in addition to the environmental considerations. Unfortunately, the proposed rule includes several missed opportunities, and could ultimately stifle innovative new technologies in emissions detection and increase the cost of energy for Americans.

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U.S. Energy Production Up, Emissions Down

crude oil  production  us energy security  emission reductions  epa ghg regulations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 23, 2018

Two stat lines capture the essence of modern natural gas and oil development:

First, the United States produced a record 11 million barrels of oil per day (mbd) in September, 2.2 mbd more than September 2017, according to API’s latest Monthly Statistical Report (MSR). It’s a remarkable output number, given where domestic production was less than two decades ago.

Second point: Just as remarkable is the fact the United States’ world leadership in natural gas and oil production is accompanied by world leadership in cutting greenhouse gas emissions.


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Weighing In on EPA's Wastewater Study

water management  recycled water  epa  industry standards 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted October 9, 2018

EPA held a public hearing on its Study of Oil and Gas Extraction Wastewater Management and heard a number of comments. These include those from operators and trade associations representing industry nationally and in states with high levels of oil and natural gas production – all supporting safe, responsible onshore development using innovative solutions that protect water. A sampling.

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Dear Mr. President: Protect Consumers From E15's Potential Harms

consumers  renewable fuel standard  e15  ethanol  epa 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted September 27, 2018

With recent reports indicating that the EPA is moving to facilitate the year-round sale of E15 gasoline – which studies have shown could put consumers at risk – API and American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM) this week wrote a letter to President Trump urging the administration not to take actions that could negatively impact refiners.

Specifically, EPA is preparing an extension to the one-pound Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) waiver to E15 fuel, coupled with potentially problematic changes to Renewable Identification Number (RIN) market trading. 

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EPA, Smarter Regulation and Lowering Emissions

emission reductions  epa  regulation  oil and natural gas  the-environmental-partnership 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 13, 2018

Let’s push back against a narrative springing up around EPA’s proposed improvements to the 2016 standards on  emissions from new natural gas and oil production sources – which the agency says will streamline implementation, reduce duplication with state requirements and decrease unnecessary burdens on domestic energy producers.

First, while API reviews EPA’s proposal, it’s important to note that it appears the rule will continue to protect public health and reduce emissions through standards that are smarter, science-based and that promote greater cost-effectiveness – while industry keeps on delivering the energy Americans use every day.

The narrative is based on a mythology that natural gas and oil companies don’t care about emissions and won’t develop new technologies and innovations to capture more and more emissions unless Washington makes them do it. False and false.

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Next On Ozone

ozone standards  air quality  epa 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 21, 2018

EPA’s recent decision not to revisit 2015 ozone standards suggests a couple of points as the agency looks ahead to its scheduled 2020 review of the ozone air quality standards.

First, it’s imperative that EPA build its 2020 review around quality science – for one, to properly consider background levels of ozone and how they affect where the federal government sets the standards. For some parts of the country the 2015 standards were near levels of background ozone – setting up compliance problems for places such as Yellowstone National Park.

Second, on the road to the 2020 review, there should be discussion of implementation relief – from EPA or directly by Congress legislatively. 

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Methane Regulation and Risking Emissions Progress

natural gas production  epa regulation  methane  emssions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 12, 2016

We’ll say it again: Methane emissions are falling. And they’ll continue doing so because industry wants to capture as much of the primary component of natural gas as possible, for delivery to consumers.

So that’s the context for EPA’s regulatory initiative. Basically, the agency looked at the energy landscape – one of surging production but also declining emissions – and determined the next step should be more regulation. The resulting new rules could hinder America’s shale energy revolution, one that has helped lower U.S. energy-related carbon emissions 12 percent below 2005 levels, allowing the United States to lead the world in reducing carbon emissions.

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Ozone Science, Facts Should Guide Public Debate

ozone standards  air quality  economic impacts  job losses  epa regulation  policy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 29, 2015

With EPA opening public hearings (subscription required) on its proposed new ground-level ozone standards, it’s important that we not let some key facts get lost in the wave of comments and anecdotes that results when there’s an open microphone available.

At issue is EPA’s plan to make more restrictive the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone, from the current 75 parts per billion (ppb) to between 65 and 70 ppb. The agency is collecting input until mid-March before finalizing the rule this fall.

We’ve made the case before that the existing standards are working, that our air is getting cleaner and will continue to do so with the current rule. In short, there’s no good reason to make the standards more stringent. That’s what the science shows, as experts detailed at EPA’s hearing in Washington, D.C. (here and here). Indeed, EPA’s own data shows that ozone levels have fallen 33 percent since 1980, including 18 percent since 2000.

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The New Move to Regulate Methane

shale energy  methane emissions  emission reductions  regulation  epa ghg regulations  oil and natural gas development  american petroleum institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 15, 2015

As we look at the Obama administration’s plan to impose new regulations on methane emissions from oil and natural gas operations, some important points.

First, when it comes to methane emissions, the White House is focusing on a relatively small piece of the big picture. Data from EPA’s Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program shows that methane emissions from natural gas and petroleum systems (161.6 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent) represent just 28.5 percent of total methane emissions (567.3 million metric tons CO2 equivalent). That’s a fairly small wedge in the overall pie.


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More Good News on Methane Emissions

safe operations  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  fracking  natural gas development  methane emissions  industry standards  epa regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 9, 2014

New research by the University of Texas shows what other studies have shown: methane emissions from natural gas production are lower than previously estimated. The UT study found that emissions represent just 0.38 percent of production – about 10 percent lower than a 2013 study by the same research team.

The UT study checked two sources of methane emissions in natural gas production: processes to clear wells of accumulated liquids to increase production, called liquid unloadings; and pneumatic controller devices that open and close valves.

The study found that just 19 percent of pneumatic devices accounted for 95 percent of emissions from that equipment, and that just 20 percent of wells with unloading emissions that vent to the atmosphere accounted for 65 percent to 85 percent of those emissions. David Allen, the study’s principal investigator:

“To put this in perspective, over the past several decades, 10 percent of the cars on the road have been responsible for the majority of automotive exhaust pollution. Similarly, a small group of sources within these two categories are responsible for the vast majority of pneumatic and unloading emissions at natural gas production sites.”

The results suggest that technologies and practices already in use by industry – voluntary efforts and those to comply with federal green completions rules that become standard in January – are working to reduce methane leaks.

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