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Energy Tomorrow Blog

U.S. Energy Production Up, Emissions Down

crude oil  production  us energy security  emission reductions  epa ghg regulations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 23, 2018

Two stat lines capture the essence of modern natural gas and oil development:

First, the United States produced a record 11 million barrels of oil per day (mbd) in September, 2.2 mbd more than September 2017, according to API’s latest Monthly Statistical Report (MSR). It’s a remarkable output number, given where domestic production was less than two decades ago.

Second point: Just as remarkable is the fact the United States’ world leadership in natural gas and oil production is accompanied by world leadership in cutting greenhouse gas emissions.


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Climate Lawsuits vs. Climate Solutions

climate  emission reductions  carbon emissions  ghg mitigation technologies 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 22, 2017

Here are some of my thoughts after this week’s news that San Francisco and Oakland have filed lawsuits against five oil and natural companies, arguing that the companies should pay for sea walls to protect the cities in case ocean levels rise due to changing climate:

First, the courts aren’t the place to address climate change policy. This is a complex, global issue that requires global engagement in the public square, not in a courtroom. In this country, elected officials debate public policy issues and then take appropriate action. Lawsuits of the type filed this week tend to serve special interests, polarize people and hinder real solutions.

The second point is action. Contrary to the lawsuit’s assertions, our industry is a leader on climate action, working to reduce emissions as part of a broader solution to those challenges. Since 2000 our industry has invested nearly $90 billion in emissions-reducing technologies – almost as much as the rest of U.S.-based private industries combined and more than twice the amount invested by each of the next three industry sectors.

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BLM Rule Could Impact Production, Revenues to Governments

natural gas  ghg regulations  policy 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted February 23, 2017

When the U.S. Senate returns to work, repealing the Bureau of Land Management’s “venting and flaring rule” should be a top priority. The redundant and technically flawed rule, which went into effect last month, could negatively impact production – some say it already has. The House has voted for repeal under the Congressional Review Act (CRA), and the Senate should follow the House’s lead.

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Innovation, Science, and Fracking

hydraulic fracturing  ghg emission reduction  regulations  drinking water  energy production  horizontal drilling  carbon emissions 

Erik Milito

Erik Milito
Posted June 9, 2016

Competitive forces and industry innovation continue to drive technological advances and produce clean-burning natural gas, which has led to reducing carbon emissions from power generation to their lowest level in more than 20 years, making it clear that environmental progress and energy production are not mutually exclusive.

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An Energy Dozen

consumption  production  ghg emissions  electricity  infrastructure 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 3, 2016

As social media really wants you to know, today is National Doughnut Day, so whether you spell it long or go with donut for short, here are an "energy dozen" to take in while enjoying your tasty treat.

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On Climate, Paris Talk and U.S. Action

climate  emissions  ghg emission reduction  natural gas benefits  methane 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 14, 2015

The New York Times reports that weekend exultation over the new global climate agreement was quickly replaced by the realization that talking about emissions goals in Paris could be dwarfed by what it takes to produce actual results:

Before the applause had even settled … world leaders warned that momentum from the historic accord must not be allowed to dissipate. “Today, we celebrate,” said Miguel Arias Cañete, the European Union’s energy commissioner and top climate negotiator. “Tomorrow, we have to act.” With nearly every nation on Earth having now pledged to gradually reduce emissions of the heat-trapping gases … much of the burden for maintaining the momentum shifts back to the countries to figure out, and carry out, the concrete steps needed to deliver on their vows.

 Actually, the figuring out part has been done and real emissions reductions have been realized in the United States – without the heavy hand of government, without one-size-fits-all frameworks, without economy-hamstringing interventions.

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Consumers Need More Protection From RFS

renewable fuel standard  rfs34  epa  blend wall  consumers  e15  e85  ghg emissions  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 30, 2015

In finalizing ethanol volume requirements under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), the EPA is basically testing the limits of the ethanol “blend wall” and the potential impacts of breaching it. Unfortunately, the guinea pigs in the experiment are U.S. consumers – their wallets, their vehicles.

That’s what we draw from EPA’s requirements for levels of corn ethanol and other renewable fuels that must be blended into the U.S. fuel supply. EPA officially set requirements for 2014 (two years late), 2015 (a year late) and 2016. Requirements for 2016 are the most significant – 18.11 billion gallons, which is lower than what Congress originally required when it created the RFS, but higher than what EPA proposed in May (17.4 billion gallons).

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White House Politics Versus The American People

crude oil exports  economic growth  jobs  white house  ghg mitigation technologies  oil and natural gas development 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted October 8, 2015

These things are true:

  • The U.S. gets the majority of its energy from oil and natural gas, and is projected to continue to do so for decades.
  • Since 2005 U.S. production of natural gas is up 43 percent.
  • Since 2008 U.S. production of crude oil is up 88 percent.
  • U.S. air quality continues to improve, with concentrations of carbon monoxide down 60 percent, ozone down 18 percent, lead 87 percent, nitrogen dioxide 43 percent, particulate matter 35 percent and sulfur dioxide 62 percent since 2000.
  • The federal U.S. budget deficit for FY2015 was $435 billion.
  • The U.S. trade deficit rose in August as exports hit a three-year low.
  • Since 2008 our working age population has grown by over 16 million, while employment is up 8.5 million, leaving the U.S. at odds with trends in other countries.
  • U.S. poverty and wages are stagnant, and it is getting harder for people to move beyond a minimum-wage job.
  • Americans' trust in the federal government's ability to handle domestic problems has reached a new low.

These things are true, and thus, when presented with bipartisan legislation to reduce consumer fuel costs and the trade deficit while increasing U.S. investment, domestic crude oil production, GDP and government revenues and creating good paying jobs – all via U.S. crude oil exports – the White House obviously had no choice but to … threaten to veto it.


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Energizing Kentucky

analysis  kentucky  biofuels  economy and energy  ghg emission reduction  income  ozone regulations  wood mackenzie  pricewaterhousecoopers 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 24, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Kentucky. We started the series with Virginia on June 29. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Kentucky, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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The Science of Obfuscation

analysis  oil sands  ghg emissions  heavy crude  state department  canada  keystone xl pipeline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 24, 2015

A few observations on an Energy Department-funded study that reportedly asserts Canadian oil sands will yield significantly greater emissions than conventional crude oil. We say “reportedly,” because the study itself isn’t out yet, just the abstract. Even so, the Wall Street Journal breathlessly says the “findings provide ammunition to foes of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline and other critics of surging Canadian oil output.”

Now, take a deep breath.

We’ve posted on this claim before. President Obama brought it up a couple months ago to justify more than six years of delaying a decision on the Keystone XL pipeline by the White House. Certainly, assigning alarming greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to oil sands boosts an anti-KXL, anti-oil sands position. But it’s a faulty comparison.

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