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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Trade Policy Impacts on U.S. Energy Becoming Visible

crude oil exports  production  trade  monthly-stats-report 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted September 20, 2018

In API’s latest Industry Outlook and Monthly Statistical Report, we have shifted from recognizing risks on the horizon to having a line of sight on some of them.  The effects of trade disputes in particular have become tangible.

Most notably, at the same time as the U.S. celebrated another new record for crude oil production of 10.8 million barrels per day (mb/d), U.S. petroleum exports decreased by 1.3 mb/d over the past two months.  

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CNBC Report Underscores Tariff Obstacles for U.S. Energy

trade  pipelines  oil and natural gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 28, 2018

API’s Kyle Isakower is featured in a CNBC report that estimates new steel tariffs are adding $40 million to Permian Basin pipeline costs. At issue is Plains All-American’s $1.1 billion pipeline project that would bring crude oil from the Permian to the Gulf Coast. As detailed in this post, Plains requested an exclusion from the tariff for its project, but it was denied by the Commerce Department. …

Far from being part of an “energy dominance” strategy, the administration’s tariffs on steel – including an onerous, opaque exclusions process – and other recent trade-related policies could hinder domestic natural gas and oil development, as well as infrastructure such as pipelines that is needed to fully benefit U.S. consumers.


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More Section 301 Tariffs Will Hurt Industry, the Economy and Consumers

trade  consumers  energy 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted August 21, 2018

The U.S. is leading the world in the production and refining of natural gas and oil which is boosting our economy, keeping energy affordable for consumers and benefitting American workers. Despite these facts the Trump administration continues to push policies that work against domestic energy production. Proposed additional Section 301 tariffs – and the retaliatory tariffs from China that they could provoke – follow a similar pattern. 

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Record Oil Output, Yet Dip in Petroleum Exports Suggests Tariffs’ Effect

crude oil exports  oil production  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 16, 2018

Lots of positive energy data points in API’s newest Monthly Statistical Report – and one that’s potentially concerning.

The good is that the U.S. tied its record for crude oil production in July at 10.7 million barrels per day (b/d) and set a new one for natural gas liquids, 4.4 million b/d. With total liquids production up by more than 2 million b/d compared to July 2017, the U.S. has accounted for almost all of the growth in world oil production so far in 2018 – more than compensating for production losses elsewhere around the world.

Now the potential point of concern. The U.S. petroleum trade balance retreated in July, perhaps the result – at least in part – of trade tensions prompted by new U.S. tariffs. Crude export were down 240,000 b/d last month, and refined products exports decreased 220,000 b/d.


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Don’t Let U.S. LNG Exports Become Casualty of Tariff Policy

trade  lng exports  liquefied natural gas  china 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 8, 2018

A couple of observations on China’s announcement late last week that it may impose a 25 percent tariff on U.S. shipments of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to that country – which would be in retaliation for announced U.S. tariffs on certain Chinese goods coming into this country.

First, China was the third-largest importer of U.S. LNG in 2017, accounting for nearly 15 percent of our LNG exports, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).  As those numbers indicate, this exchange of tariffs could leave a mark as far as U.S. energy exports are concerned. ...

If U.S. energy exports are restricted – at the same time trade policies have been adopted that increase the cost of the steel our industry uses – there’s a risk of significantly affecting a sector that has been a driving force for economic growth. It’s a big price to pay. 

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Tariffs and Signals From the Economy

trade  energy exports  economic growth 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted August 7, 2018

Recently, we discussed how natural gas and oil production and energy exports were major contributors to robust second-quarter growth by the U.S. economy – by themselves generating nearly half of the increase in U.S. real exports in Q2.

Yet, there’s concern that escalating U.S. trade restrictions and looming disputes could threaten global trade and economic growth. We’ve talked about tariffs and quotas directly impacting the natural gas and oil industry – China last week announced a 25 percent tariff on U.S. liquefied natural gas – but the potential effect is broader than just our industry, as indicated in last week’s post on possible food price impacts

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Energy Renaissance Continues to Help Grow Our Economy

economic growth  exports  trade 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted July 27, 2018

The U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) increased 4.1 percent in the second quarter at a seasonally-adjusted annualized rate, its best pace since 2014, driven by strong consumer and business spending as well as a surge in exports ahead of retaliatory tariffs from China. As the energy renaissance has continued to raise U.S. natural gas and oil production and exports to record levels, these abundant and affordable fuels and feedstocks contribute to the economy and — by themselves — generated nearly half of the growth in U.S. real exports in Q2.

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More Tariffs, More Problems

trade  china  consumers  infrastructure 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted July 26, 2018

The Trump administration has long touted its commitment to U.S. energy production but continues to push policies that directly counter these efforts, hurting U.S. workers and consumers in the process. The proposed Section 301 tariffs – and the retaliatory tariffs from China that they will provoke – are no exception.

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When Tariffs Become a Food Discussion

trade  consumers  economy and energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 25, 2018

Tariffs and quotas on imported steel and other products appear to be moving from a debate in Washington to Americans’ dinner tables, as farmers and others in the human food chain voice concern that a trade war – tariffs and retaliatory measures by other countries – is impacting food costs. 


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Arbitrary Process for Steel Tariff Exclusions Hurts American Workers

infrastructure  pipelines  energy  trade  consumers 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted July 25, 2018

While the administration’s goal of enhancing the economy is laudable — as is their continued promise to promote U.S. energy dominance— their latest action to deny exclusions from tariffs under Section 232 on imported steel used in certain parts of natural gas and oil industry operations is a misguided decision that could impact American energy production as well as American jobs and consumers.

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