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Energy Tomorrow Blog

CERAWeek: Sommers Talks Cooperation, Jobs and Energy Security

jobs  us energy security  climate  cera 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 2, 2021

The natural gas and oil industry is foundational to the U.S. economy and security today and will be for decades to come. That’s reality – and a welcome one, given U.S. world leadership in natural gas and oil production. Natural gas and oil frame the issues of energy and environmental progress – the priorities of safely producing the affordable reliable energy Americans use every day and boosting the economy, while also reducing emissions and our industry’s environmental footprint. We can do both, together.

API President and CEO Mike Sommers underscored these themes at this week’s CERAWeek energy conference – virtual this year because of the pandemic. Sommers’ key points: The natural gas and oil industry will work with the Biden administration as much as possible to achieve progress on climate goals – including technology and regulation; natural gas and oil are fundamental to U.S. security and world leadership; and natural gas and oil is supporting U.S. and world growth, as well as the high-paying jobs of millions of Americans.

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In U.S. Rep. Haaland, There’s Common Ground for a Working Relationship

interior department  federal leases  infrastructure  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 26, 2021

In introducing U.S. Rep. Debra Haaland – President Biden’s choice to be Interior Department secretary – to the Senate’s Energy and Natural Resources Committee, Congressman Don Young of Alaska, a staunch Republican, predicted this about his House colleague: “You’ll find out that she will listen to you.”

Given the political polarization in Washington, that’s pretty significant – and hugely important in building a bipartisan approach to energy, infrastructure and other issues associated with national economic growth, security and the environment.

The natural gas and oil industry welcomes the opportunity – if Rep. Haaland is confirmed by the full Senate – to work with her as her department manages millions of acres of federal lands and waters that are key to our country’s energy present and future.

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Is the World About to See an Oil Shortage?

oil supply and demand  production  global energy 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted February 24, 2021

It’s possible we could be headed for a shortfall in global oil supply as soon as next year – pretty remarkable considering where oil demand was last spring, with economies slowing under the weight of the pandemic.

Based on projected rising demand, the natural production decline from existing wells and decreases in drilling activity and industry investment – especially in the U.S. – the world’s oil needs could outpace production in 2022. An undersupply potentially could put upward pressure on costs, impacting consumers, manufacturers and, generally, any process that utilizes oil.

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Energy Policies and Potential Impacts on Household Budgets

consumers  consumer products  affordable energy  policy  white house 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted February 16, 2021

Most people get riled up when energy costs rise, especially prices at the pump. It’s understandable; energy represented 6.5% of household expenditures in 2019, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Expenditure Survey. Yet, as we’ll see, energy policy choices can affect far more than just what you pay for a gallon of gasoline or your monthly electricity bill.

For example, imagine how you would feel if you learned that U.S. energy policies materially raised the cost of houses and vehicles, in addition to the fuel they require, the costs of which have been on the rise. Those two together plus energy represent more than half of a typical household’s expenditures.

Higher energy costs are a distinct possibility with the Biden administration’s decision to halt new federal natural gas and oil leasing, potentially reducing domestic production, as well as possible moves on the regulatory front and other actions that could limit drilling or hydraulic fracturing. These could put upward pressure on energy costs that then would ripple across various sectors since virtually everything has an energy component.

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DOE Nominee Supports U.S. Energy, Environmental Leadership

natural gas  liquefied natural gas  department of energy 

Sam Winstel

Sam Winstel
Posted February 12, 2021

America’s natural gas and oil industry is a reliable foundation for our country’s economic recovery and resurgence, as well as a key factor in helping the nation reach climate and environmental goals. In that context, it’s encouraging to hear President Biden’s nominee to lead the U.S. Department of Energy – former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm – express support for U.S. natural gas leadership and the opportunity to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions through liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports.

The industry is committed to working with the Biden administration toward workable climate solutions, and natural gas-fueled power generation is key to a cleaner energy mix, at home and abroad.

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EIA says Natural Gas and Oil Will Remain Integral, But Where Will They Come From?

eia forecast  energy production  us energy security  federal leases 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted February 10, 2021

Natural gas and oil will remain central to meeting our nation’s energy needs well into the future. So says the nonpartisan U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) in its 2021 Annual Energy Outlook.

The analysis is critically important given the Biden administration’s apparent shift away from the previous administration’s focus on building American energy dominance through homegrown natural gas and oil – seen in the president’s executive order halting new federal leasing.

EIA’s forecast and the administration’s energy position are incompatible with each other, raising a simple question: If we aren’t allowed access to key federal natural gas and oil reserves, onshore and offshore, where will our energy supply come from?

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New API Energy Excellence Program Increases Industry Focus on Performance

API Energy Excellence  api standards program  safety standards  Environment 

Debra Phillips

Debra Phillips
Posted February 9, 2021

Setting a high bar for industry safety and operational performance isn’t new for API. For nearly a century, API has led the way in developing standards that establish how natural gas and oil and the products made from them will be safely produced and delivered to consumers – including the operations themselves, from equipment and machinery to transportation and distribution systems.

That’s the foundation for launching the new API Energy Excellence initiative – which specifies what top performance means for safety and environmental protection, as well as security and safeguarding communities. Importantly, it also sets the expectation that every API member applies the program’s 13 core elements to accelerate safety and environmental progress in the natural gas and oil industry.

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Millennial Employees Enthusiastic About the Future of Energy

workforce  state of american energy  innovation  technology 

Sam Winstel

Sam Winstel
Posted February 3, 2021

Young professionals in the natural gas and oil industry know how far the sector has come over the past few decades, in terms of energy expansion and environmental protection, and they see the endless possibilities for continued progress. These industry employees are confident that America’s energy future will be built on affordable, reliable and ever-cleaner fuels, and they hope to make lasting contributions in their communities.

The views of industry Millennials were highlighted at last month’s State of American Energy event, which featured a roundtable conversation with them. The seven young professionals are employed at companies representing a cross-section of the natural gas and oil industry, and their insights reflect the sector’s ongoing progress and the optimistic vision for a cost-effective, sustainable energy future.

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Administration’s Leasing Approach is a ‘Step Backwards’ on U.S. Energy

us energy security  federal leases  white house  policy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 27, 2021

As the Biden administration takes the first step toward a complete ban on federal natural gas and oil development – including the offshore that accounted for more than one-fifth of U.S. oil production in 2019 – turning America’s energy strength into weakness by launching a new era of increased dependence on foreign oil, let’s see how out of step the approach is with the American people.

From polling of voters last summer in key battleground and other states:  93% said it’s important the U.S. produce enough energy to avoid being reliant on foreign oil; 90% said it’s important to create access to domestic energy; 69% said safe domestic natural gas and oil production makes the U.S. less reliant on foreign energy and has increased U.S. security. (Just 16% disagreed.)

All three viewpoints sharply contrast with where the Biden administration appears to be going with its announced halt on natural gas and oil leasing on federal lands and waters – which many believe will become a full ban on federal development.

Put simply, the White House is advancing an import-more-oil policy – one that would discard the hard-earned security, economic and environmental gains from a decade and a half of domestic energy resurgence. 

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Early Missteps on Energy are Blows to Economy, Security

white house  keystone xl pipeline  federal leases  economic growth  jobs  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 25, 2021

It’s unfortunate that the Biden administration’s first couple of energy decisions – effectively canceling the Keystone XL pipeline and signaling it will halt new federal natural gas and oil leasing – work against economic growth and could undermine the nation’s energy security.

With the U.S. economy struggling to recover from the pandemic, there could hardly be a worse time for actions that kill jobs, potentially increase energy costs and cause the U.S. to import more oil.

Sure, the president promised these things during the campaign. Yet, it’s disappointing nonetheless that thousands of U.S. workers associated with building the Keystone XL are now without jobs and that a federal leasing ban could start a new era of increasing U.S. energy dependence. Coincidentally, the administration just unveiled its “Buy American” initiative. What about energy? How about “Buy American Energy”?

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