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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Energizing Wisconsin

analysis  wisconsin  energy development  income  oil and natural gas development  ozone regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 13, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Wisconsin. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

Information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information will be populated on this map as the series continues. 

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Energizing West Virginia

analysis  west virginia  energy development  income  ozone regulations  oil and natural gas development  wood mackenzie  pricewaterhousecoopers 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 9, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with West Virginia. We started our focus on the state level with Virginia on June 29 and continued this week with Missouri, Indiana and North Carolina. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

Information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information will be populated on this map as the series continues. 

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Energizing Indiana

analysis  energy development  income  indiana  oil and natural gas development  ozone regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 7, 2015

Last week, we launched a series of posts that, over the next few weeks, will highlight the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states. The series started with Virginia, Ohio, Colorado, and New Mexico . Yesterday, we looked at Missouri. Today: Indiana.

The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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Safe Energy for America’s Future

news  safe operations  fracking  epa  shale energy  keystone xl  alaska  ozone  oil and natural gas development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 6, 2015

USA Today (editorial)Fracking — the practice of cracking open underground oil and gas formations with water, sand and chemicals — has rescued U.S. energy production from a dangerous decline. Any debate about banning it should take a hard look at what that would cost the nation and at facts that aren't always part of the discussion.

Those facts are spelled out in a recent report from the Environmental Protection Agency on fracking and groundwater. One of the harshest charges against fracking, often leveled with apocalyptic intensity by its foes, is that it indiscriminately contaminates vital drinking water supplies.

The EPA's timely report essentially said that's overblown.

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Energizing Missouri

analysis  missouri  energy development  income  oil and natural gas development  ozone regulations  wood mackenzie  pricewaterhousecoopers 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 6, 2015

Last week, we launched a summer long series of posts that will highlight the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states. We started the week with Virginia and continued on with Ohio, Colorado and New Mexico. Today: Missouri.

The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added

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Energizing New Mexico

analysis  new mexico  income  hydraulic fracturing  oil and natural gas development  ozone regulations  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 2, 2015

Today we look at New Mexico, continuing our series of posts that highlight the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states. We started with Virginia, then Ohio, and Colorado. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

The topline numbers: 105,600 jobs supported statewide; according to PwC; $11 billion added to the state economy; $5.3 contributed to the state’s labor income. All are significant drivers for the state’s economy.

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U.S. Energy for Export

news  energy exports  crude oil  shale energy  biofuels  renewable fuel standard  ozone  taxes 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 18, 2015

SNL Accusing OPEC of manipulating crude oil prices, the founder, chairman and CEO of Bakken Shale pioneer Continental Resources Inc. on June 16 detailed arguments for lifting the U.S. ban on oil exports, saying exports would rejuvenate a flat-lining oil industry while lowering domestic gasoline prices.

Speaking to a Washington, D.C.-centric crowd at the U.S. Energy Information Administration's 2015 Energy Conference in Washington, Harold Hamm said the combination of North Dakota's Bakken Shale and Texas' Eagle Ford Shale and "new" Permian shales — "Cowboystan" — provides the nation with more than enough production and reserves to permit exporting light, sweet crude oil.

"Horizontal drilling has transformed" oil and gas production in the U.S. to where the country "reaches energy independence" by 2020 and "we can get to the point where we can produce 20 million barrels per day," more than double what the U.S. has produced in recent months, according to the EIA.

"Only in America" could Cowboystan happen, Hamm said, because of the "three Rs: rigs, rednecks and royalties."

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Energy and New Momentum

news  oil and natural gas production  ozone  fracking  global markets  epa 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 16, 2015

PlattsStabilizing crude oil prices and falling drilling costs could soon boost US production by hundreds of thousands of barrels per day, an upstream oil and gas economist with the US Energy Information Administration, said Monday.

"We're starting to see a turn in production," Grant Nulle said during a panel discussion at EIA's annual conference. "Conditions are conducive for this to happen."

While recent EIA data has shown production declines at existing wells have outpaced production from new wells, a rebound is likely as operators focus on the most efficient wells and look to increase well completions amid falling costs and continued availability of capital, Nulle said.

In a recent survey of 85,000 wells drilled between 2012 and 2014, initial production rates have roughly doubled, he said.

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EPA’s Unobtainable Ozone Proposal

analysis  ozone  epa  regulation  clean air act  economic impacts 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 12, 2015

For some time we’ve been talking about EPA’s bid to make the nation’s ozone standards more restrictive.

We’ve expressed puzzlement that the agency wants to impose more stringent standards when the existing ones are working – lowering ozone levels 18 percent between 2000 and 2013 according to EPA’s own data. We’ve noted the lack of scientific and public health justification for stricter standards while highlighting potential risks to the economy.  If this week’s House Energy and Commerce subcommittee hearing on ozone was any measure, the issue has the attention of many in Congress.

Top EPA official Janet McCabe was peppered with questions about economic impacts, the arguable wisdom of stricter standards when areas like Los Angeles don’t meet existing standards and EPA’s push for more stringent standards before the current standards are fully implemented in the states.

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Briefing: The Potential Downsides of EPA’s Ozone Proposal

analysis  ozone standards  epa  economic impacts  air quality  american petroleum institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 28, 2015

We’ve written quite a bit recently about EPA’s proposal to impose stricter ozone standards on the U.S. (see here, here and here) – and the reason is there’s so much at stake.

If implemented, the stricter ozone standards could be the costliest regulation ever, potentially reducing U.S. GDP by $270 billion per year and $3.4 trillion from 2017 to 2040, according to a study by NERA Economic Consulting for the National Association of Manufacturers. The U.S. could see 2.9 million fewer jobs or job equivalents per year on average through 2040.

Yeah, that’s big.

Certainly, for those kinds of impacts Americans would expect them to be justified. But EPA’s proposal is starkly lacking in terms of the science and public health.

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