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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Keep Crude Exports Debate Focused on Jobs, Security

crude oil exports  domestic oil production  economic growth  jobs  us energy security  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 13, 2015

Last week’s bipartisan U.S. House vote to end America’s 1970s-era ban on crude oil exports is stirring needed debate over U.S. energy and trade policy as the exports issue advances in Congress. Unfortunately, much of the conversation remains focused on the wrong things.

For example, export opponents continue to say the United States shouldn’t export crude oil as long as it’s an oil importer. We rebutted that economically faulty position here.  Access to global markets means bringing overseas wealth to the United States. Conversely, shutting in a domestic commodity is an obstacle to production and economic growth. The oil imports/exports threshold is one that isn’t applied to other domestic goods – and for good reason: Access to global markets is good for domestic producers.

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The Crude Oil Exports Vote

crude oil exports  domestic oil production  economic growth  jobs  Energy Security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 7, 2015

The U.S. House has an important vote scheduled for Friday on legislation that would lift the 1970s-era ban on domestic crude oil exports. It’s an historic chance for U.S. policymakers to affirm that America’s energy picture is fundamentally and dramatically improved from where it was four decades ago – thanks to surging domestic production that has made the United States the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas.

It boils down to this: A vote for the bill would be a vote for U.S. jobs, economic growth, trade benefits  and strengthened American security. It would be a vote for U.S. consumers and American global competitiveness. It would be a vote for America’s friends abroad, who see U.S. energy as a global supply diversifier and stabilizer. As one ally said earlier this year, with U.S. oil exports the “world itself will be a … safer place.”

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Energy Revolution Benefits, Winter Edition

heating fuels  consumer products  natural gas  oil  electricity  energy information administration 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 6, 2015

Last month we connected he lowest pre-Labor Day gasoline prices in more than a decade with the global cost of crude oil, the main factor in prices at the pump. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) attributed crude prices, in part, with growth in global supply – due in no small part to increases in U.S. oil production. Abbreviated: Thanks, U.S. energy revolution.

Now comes EIA’s Winter Fuels Outlook, with forecasts that household heating costs will be lower than the previous two winters. Thanks again, U.S. energy.

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Fueling the Energy Revolution

analysis  oil and natural gas production  hydraulic fracturing  economic growth  Energy Security  energy exports  jobs  ethanol 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 30, 2015

America’s energy revolution means … a United States that’s more energy self-sufficient – less dependent on others, more secure in the world and better positioned to help friends abroad; economic growth and job creation – and with the right policy choices, a golden opportunity to secure American prosperity well into the future; and a stronger U.S. trading posture that, with energy exports, could benefit consumers

Let’s look at some charts that illustrate this American energy renaissance – which is based on the surge in domestic production that has accompanied the growth of safe, advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling since the mid-2000s.

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Anti-Domestic Energy Policies Would Harm U.S.

analysis  access  oil and natural gas development  federal leases  economic growth  Energy Security  jobs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 25, 2015

The Washington Post reports that a coalition of environmental activists wants the Obama administration to stop new federal leasing for oil and natural gas development. Notwithstanding the broad energy, economic and security benefits produced by America’s energy revolution, the opportunity to secure America’s future and significant air quality progress, their position is simple: Keep it in the ground.

The position also is extreme, anti-progress and anti-modern – though hardly surprising. There’s a small but loud element that has little interest in safe and responsible energy development or in constant improvement of operational and environmental safety. Rather, it opposes development altogether. Their recent push is the latest sign of an agenda that would put America in retreat economically and in the world.

What’s surprising is that these activists actually concede that Americans want oil and natural gas. They acknowledge consumer demand for oil and gas – affordable, reliable and portable fuels that make life less harsh, healthier and more prosperous – but they want government to choke off that demand by cutting supply.

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Video: Fracking Water Use, in Context

analysis  hydraullic fracturing  horizontal drilling  fracking  water  energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 23, 2015

A new EnergyFromShale.org video shows the relatively tiny amount of water needed to develop U.S. energy with safe hydraulic fracturing – the chief reason (along with advanced horizontal drilling) that the United States now is the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas

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Crude Oil Exports, Imports and Fig Leaves

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  oil production  economic benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 18, 2015

First, they said it was about protecting consumers. Opponents of lifting the U.S. ban on crude oil exports claimed that allowing domestic crude to reach the global market would negatively impact Americans at the gas pump. But every major economic study looking at the issue has blown away that fig leaf.

The studies – from Brookings Energy Security Initiative to IHS to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) – estimate that U.S. oil exports would put downward pressure on U.S. gasoline prices, benefiting American consumers.

There have been other fig leaves.

Exports opponents say America shouldn’t export crude as long as our country is an oil importer. They also say the U.S. should isolate its crude from the global marketplace for national security reasons and that for those reasons oil should be treated differently than other U.S. commodities that are freely traded. These, too, have been blown away by the facts and sound economic analysis.

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A Flawed Approach on Climate, Energy

analysis  climate change  energy development  emissions  natural gas benefits  Jack Gerard 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted September 17, 2015

Below is the first of a short series of posts on the intersection of energy development and efforts to meet climate-change goals. In this post, API President and CEO Jack Gerard comments on the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan and its flawed approach of picking winners and losers in the energy sector.

On Monday, Aug. 3, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced sweeping new carbon regulations for power plants. By Wednesday, Aug. 5, the government announced carbon emissions from power plants in April 2015 reached a 27-year low.

Did the costly, top-down mandates of the Clean Power Plan really work that quickly? Of course not. The dramatic emissions reductions are the result of market forces that have nothing to do with heavy-handed government regulations and everything to do with the fact that the United States is the world’s leading producer of natural gas.

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Lift the Oil Export Ban, Strengthen America

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  economic benefits  american petroleum institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 15, 2015

So here we are: Legislation that would end America’s 40-year-old ban on the export of domestic crude oil is moving through Congress – and better, there’s bipartisan momentum behind it.

Resistance to lifting the crude exports ban has no credible footholds – reflecting the breadth of the economic analysis supporting exports. There’s also the realization by most Americans that our country’s ongoing energy revolution has pretty much dashed the 1970s-era justifications for excluding American energy from the global marketplace, where it could be positively affecting global crude markets, stimulating production here at home and providing real energy aid to America’s allies.

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Live Event: Impacts of the Crude Oil Exports Ban

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  economic benefits  production  american petroleum institute  Jack Gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 15, 2015

Join us Tuesday morning for a live event from Washington, D.C., that will explore the impacts of America’s crude oil exports ban on our economy, national security, foreign policy, the environment, consumers and more.

The event, hosted by National Journal and sponsored by API, is scheduled to begin at 8:45 a.m. API President and CEO Jack Gerard will introduce the event, followed by remarks from U.S. Sens. Heidi Heitkamp and John Hoeven, both of North Dakota, and Ed Markey of Massachusetts. 

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