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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Additional Energy Tariffs Could Harm U.S., Consumers

trade  consumers  policy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 10, 2019

Natural gas and oil, the bellwether of the U.S. economy, continue to be the collateral damage in the administration’s trade war with China – frustratingly ironic given the White House’s stated goal of bolstering American energy.

Important parts for offshore natural gas and oil drilling and production, as well as critical parts and accessories for energy projects are among products imported from China that will be subject to a 30% tariff as of Oct. 1 – an increase from the current 25% tariff.

Higher costs for these needed components could increase the cost of production and, ultimately, energy costs to U.S. consumers.

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New Modeling Shows Impacts of Trade Policy Gone Awry

policy  trade  oil and natural gas 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted February 20, 2019

Earlier this month we talked about the unforced error of the administration’s tariff and quota policies that hamstring the economy, detailing the findings of recent report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. Now, new modeling has reviewed those suspicions in the context of the energy trade, and the indications are clear: The escalating trade wars could significantly limit the U.S. energy revolution and the benefits to Americans that it would otherwise bring.

The recent report, part of BP’s annual “Outlook,” a macro-look at the global energy system over the next 30 years, models a number of different scenarios including one in which global trade disputes persist and worsen. The results of this “less globalization” scenario indicate that the continuation of these policies would slow global GDP growth by 6 percent and energy demand growth by 4 percent in 2040. To make matters worse, the effect could be intensified in countries and regions most exposed to foreign trade – like the U.S.

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Sustaining U.S. Energy Through Right Policies

oil and natural gas production  policy  colorado 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 31, 2018

U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry makes a number of important points about domestic natural gas and oil production, hydraulic fracturing and U.S. energy exports in a piece for CNBC. These include: The United States is shedding dependence on imported energy; U.S. energy exports are helping friends and allies overseas; and natural gas is helping the U.S. lead in cutting greenhouse gas emissions.


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Why the U.S. Must Import and Export Oil

crude oil exports  refineries  gasoline prices  energy policy 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted June 14, 2018

With Wall Street Journal headlines such as “Trans-Atlantic Oil-Price Spread Soars as Supply Glut Disappears,” it might be hard to remember that the United States’ domestic oil production stood at a record 10.5 million barrels per day (mb/d) in April, and the nation’s petroleum trade balance is in its best position in 50 years. This has reinforced U.S. energy security, lowered the trade deficit and boosted economic growth.

That said, given our country’s much improved energy outlook, some may question why we’re still importing crude oil and refined products. And, while we’re still importing oil, why do we export domestic crude – especially when prices have risen at the pump?  Why don’t we just keep American oil at home? ... 

Answers are found in an understanding of basic market realities.

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Energy, Technology Enable U.S. Prosperity.

economic growth  oil and natural gas  technology  energy policy 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted January 11, 2018

Metropolitan areas that are near natural gas, oil and mining activity have been exceptionally productive and able to sustain high productivity over time, according to a recent Brookings Institution study. While overall U.S. productivity has continued to slow, metro area participation in the energy and technology booms has become a precursor of high productivity and growth.

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API, CAPP, and AMEXHI committed to strong North American energy alliance

canada  consumers  economic policy  Energy Security  energy policy  mexico 

Brooke Sammons

Brooke Sammon
Posted April 24, 2017

The North American energy flows continue to grow and the U.S. is building even stronger energy ties with its closest neighbors – Canada and Mexico. This week, API met with the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) and the Mexican Association of Hydrocarbon Companies (AMEXHI) to discuss priorities and policies that would foster this North American energy alliance. 

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BLM Rule Could Impact Production, Revenues to Governments

natural gas  ghg regulations  policy 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted February 23, 2017

When the U.S. Senate returns to work, repealing the Bureau of Land Management’s “venting and flaring rule” should be a top priority. The redundant and technically flawed rule, which went into effect last month, could negatively impact production – some say it already has. The House has voted for repeal under the Congressional Review Act (CRA), and the Senate should follow the House’s lead.

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RFS Needs Real Solutions, Not New Distraction

rfs34  policy 

Sabrina Fang

Sabrina Fang
Posted February 23, 2017

The recent push to shift responsibility for compliance with the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), from refiners and importers to independent blenders and retail gasoline stations, is a flawed approach that could impact consumers at the gasoline pump and does nothing to fix the larger set of problems that plague the RFS – problems Congress must address by repealing the program or significantly reforming it. API Downstream Group Director Frank Macchiarola discussed these issues during a conference call with reporters.

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Repeal BLM's Flawed Venting and Flaring Rule

policy  natural gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 19, 2017

Late this month or in early February, let’s hope Congress uses the Congressional Review Act to fast-track the repeal of a number of the Obama administration’s late regulatory thrusts that could needlessly hinder domestic energy development.

A top priority for CRA repeal should be the so-called venting and flaring rule developed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) that went into effect this week. BLM’s rule is technically flawed and redundant, and it could impede the technological innovations that have led to increased domestic use of cleaner-burning natural gas – the main reason U.S. energy-related carbon emissions have fallen to levels not seen since the early 1990s.

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Colorado’s Energy Future: All of the Above or Limited Opportunity?

colorado  policy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 8, 2016

These are the stakes: Whether Colorado and the nation will continue to safely develop natural resources for the good of all Americans, or whether development of oil and natural gas – which supply 67 percent of the energy we use today and which the U.S. Energy Information Administration projects will supply 68 percent of our energy in 2040 – will be thoughtlessly discarded, to the state’s and the country’s detriment.

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