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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Talk Infrastructure – Build Keystone XL Pipeline

analysis  infrastructure  keystone xl pipeline  energy investment  economic benefits  american petroleum institute  Jack Gerard  canadian oil sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 11, 2015

Vice President Joe Biden underscored the administration’s call for infrastructure spending during a Bloomberg Government event that focused on the country’s deteriorating delivery and transportation systems.

Highlights include: The Washington politics of infrastructure spending is challenging. “The idea that there is a debate on the Hill on the need to invest in infrastructure is mind blowing,” Biden said. The world’s energy epicenter is North America, and the U.S. needs major investments in energy infrastructure. “We will face a national security dilemma” if we don’t enhance our energy infrastructure, he said. Companies need to have certainty that they can get their products to market efficiently.

Let’s pause a moment and consider these valid points on infrastructure from the vantage point of this administration’s crowning infrastructure decision (or non-decision): the Keystone XL pipeline.

In the Keystone XL, the administration has had the opportunity – for more than six years – to green light $5.4 billion in private infrastructure spending that would create jobs, boost the economy and transport oil from Canada and the U.S. Bakken region – reliably and safely – to our Gulf Coast refineries, enhancing America’s energy security. All with the simple stroke of the president’s pen.

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Intangible Costs, Real Benefits

energy investment  cost recovery  intangible drilling costs  tax policy  oil and natural gas development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 18, 2014

Since its inception the U.S. tax code has allowed taxpayers to recover business costs and be taxed only on net income – the idea being that quick recovery of costs would help spur reinvestment and support business expansion. This, in turn, boosts the economy and serves the national interest.

It is working in energy. Because of the cost of drilling wells and the need to invest in a depleting asset, cost recovery and reinvestment is an important part of the reason America has an energy revolution today. Mechanisms like the one for intangible drilling costs (IDC) help support the entrepreneurial risk-taking and investment that keep the revolution going.

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Investing in Energy Infrastructure, Investing in America

infrastructure  energy investment  oil and natural gas development  economic growth  pipeline construction  storage tanks 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 15, 2014

Last month a new study said more than $640 billion in energy infrastructure investments will be needed in the U.S. over the next two decades. Needed are pipelines, pumps and other infrastructure to keep pace with expected increases in domestic oil and natural gas production, the ICF International report said – much of it coming from energy reserves found in shale and other tight-rock formations through advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. ICF:

“Sufficient infrastructure goes hand in hand with well-functioning markets. Insufficient infrastructure can constrain market growth and strand supplies, potentially leading to increased price volatility and reduced economic activity.”

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Energy Works for America

oil and natural gas development  job growth  economic growth  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  shale energy  investment 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 25, 2014

The energy industry is working for America. A new Manhattan Institute report finds that in the slowly recovering U.S. economy the oil and natural gas industry is creating jobs and generating broad economic stimulus. Top findings:

  • While overall U.S. employment has yet to return levels predating the 2008 recession, the number of oil and natural gas jobs has grown 40 percent since then.
  • The U.S. energy revolution is almost entirely the result of development by more than 20,000 small and midsize businesses. The typical oil and natural gas firm has fewer than 15 employees.
  • Industry jobs are geographically dispersed. Sixteen states have more than 150,000 jobs in the oil and natural gas sector.

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American Energy – And Tax Fairness

energy  investment  tax  fairness 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 10, 2013

American Energy has been a positive story these past few years, thanks in large part to big innovations, and big investments made by America's oil and natural gas companies.  Thanks to America’s energy revolution, domestic oil production is higher than at any time in the last 20 years,  and net imports are at a 20-year low.  Meanwhile, natural gas production is at an all-time high, increasing our energy security and lowering emissions.  All while the industry is leading the way in job creation during what have been some rough economic times.

The industry is proud to be investing in America’s future, which is why we are puzzled today that the new budget from the White House, again, calls for increased energy taxes that could set back some of the progress we have made.

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Energy Security, Economic Security and Retirement Security

energy economy  energy investment  natural gas 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 31, 2013

More than 97 percent of stock in U.S. oil and natural gas companies is held by the public, including many Americans who depend on these earnings to secure their retirements through investments in IRAs, 401(k)s and pension funds. So when oil and natural gas company earnings are strong, it’s good news for retirees.

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VIDEO: The Formula for Energy Growth

energy development  energy policy  energy regulation  energy investment 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 25, 2013

Another video interview from the State of American Energy event earlier this month in Washington, D.C. Here, Chevron’s Dan Fager talks about the pillars of sound, pro-growth energy policy – new access to U.S. oil and natural gas resources, common-sense regulation and tax policies that encourage new energy investment instead of discouraging it:

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