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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Colorado Anti-Energy Initiative Looms Large for State, Nation

colorado  oil and natural gas  production  jobs  economic growth  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 30, 2018

A map shows just how much damage could be done to the United States’ fifth-leading natural gas and seventh-largest oil producing state by Colorado’s Initiative 97 – the anti-energy, anti-progress measure that state officials said will be on the November election ballot. Coloradoans and all Americans should be very concerned.

Zeroing in on the state’s top five producing counties (outlined in blue) – Weld in the north on the border with Wyoming, Rio Blanco and Garfield on the western border with Utah, and La Plata and Las Animas on the southern border with New Mexico – the map shows that opportunity for new natural gas and oil development on non-federal land would be all but prohibited.

This is an alarming prospect for all Americans, because we’re talking about putting the brakes on one of the country’s leading and fastest-growing energy producers.

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Sustaining U.S. Energy Through Right Policies

oil and natural gas production  policy  colorado 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 31, 2018

U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry makes a number of important points about domestic natural gas and oil production, hydraulic fracturing and U.S. energy exports in a piece for CNBC. These include: The United States is shedding dependence on imported energy; U.S. energy exports are helping friends and allies overseas; and natural gas is helping the U.S. lead in cutting greenhouse gas emissions.


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Progress and Opportunity: The State of Colorado Energy

colorado  natural gas  production 

Tracee Bentley

Tracee Bentley
Posted July 23, 2018

Colorado’s natural gas and oil industry thrives by working collaboratively with stakeholders of various and, sometimes, differing interests. Development in the Centennial State is well-regulated and places great emphasis on the safety of our communities and the environment, and the industry has grown by leaps and bounds as a result. In fact, Colorado is now the fifth-largest natural gas producer and the seventh-largest oil producer in the United States. This growth has fundamentally reshaped Colorado’s economy for the better, which is why these collaborative conversations must continue to occur.

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API Q2 Industry Outlook: The Tide Turns

american petroleum institute  economics  oil and natural gas production 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted June 21, 2018

The API Industry Outlook for the second quarter of 2018 is one of the things that’s new at API.  If you follow energy markets, you’ll appreciate an incisive view of the economy at home and abroad as well as markets for crude oil, natural gas and petrochemicals. 

Beyond nice-to-know “macro factors,” here are things to know and understand about trade barriers that could affect economic activity and prices where you work and live.

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The Facts on Gasoline Prices

gasoline prices  crude oil prices  taxes  oil and natural gas production 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted May 22, 2018

Washington is known for partisan political skirmishing, so it’s not surprising that a group of Senate Democrats is trying to score political points against this year’s tax reform legislation by suggesting that lowering the corporate income tax rate has been linked to the recent rise in gasoline prices.

Let’s straighten them out on a couple of important things about gasoline prices, which have nothing to do with tax reform.

First, per-barrel costs for crude oil – the No. 1 factor in the cost of producing gasoline and diesel – have risen due to a tighter global oil supply/demand balance and lower inventories compared to last year. Second, with a strong economy, U.S. petroleum demand has run at its highest levels since 2007 and was up by more than 750,000 barrels per day in April, compared with one year ago. Next, as they do every year around Memorial Day, the start of the summer driving season, Americans are traveling more, which could raise demand further. Finally, although gasoline prices have increased recently, they’re still lower than where they were four years ago, largely because of increased domestic oil production.


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January MSR: Oil Scores Perfect ‘10.2’

oil and natural gas production  refining and distribution  economic impacts 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted February 16, 2018

U.S. crude oil production scored a perfect “10” in January – make that 10.2, to be precise, as in 10.2 million barrels per day (mbd). That record production, combined with a new high for refinery throughput and 6.3 mbd of crude oil and refined product exports, narrowed the price difference between U.S. and international crude prices last month and underscored the global impact of U.S. energy. All of this data and more may be found in API’s Monthly Statistical Report for January

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The Meaning of 10.038 Million Barrels Per Day

oil and natural gas production  shale energy  us energy security  technology innovation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 1, 2018

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that in November, U.S. oil production hit 10.038 million barrels per day

– the most in half a century. Three big takeaways: America is stronger and our future is more secure; our industry's technologies are building a better future; and U.S. energy is in it for the long haul.

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Why Leading the World in Oil, Natural Gas Output Matters

oil and natural gas production  security  energy exports  economic growth  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 23, 2016

New figures from the U.S. Energy Information Administration show the United States remained the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas in 2015, a position the U.S. has held since 2012.

Several important points here, supporting the idea that U.S. world energy leadership is a big thing.

First, U.S. production of oil and natural gas grew last year despite continued low prices for crude last year. U.S. output of petroleum and other liquid fuels grew from 14.08 million barrels per day in 2014 to 15.04 million barrels per day in 2015. According to EIA, natural gas production rose from 74.89 billion cubic feet per day (bcf/d) in 2014 to 78.94 bcf/d in 2015, or about 13.99 million barrels of oil equivalent per day.

The second point is the vast majority of U.S. energy production is the result of safe and responsible hydraulic fracturing and modern horizontal drilling – fracking.

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EIA’s ‘Sneak Peek’ and Growing Energy Benefits

oil and natural gas production  security  economic growth  energy exports  climate  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 17, 2016

The United States in 2040 will be more energy self-sufficient, a net energy exporter and a lower source of energy-related carbon emissions as clean-burning natural gas becomes the dominant fuel for generating electricity. The leading energy source 24 years into the future – as they are now – will be oil and natural gas.  

So projects the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) in an early look at select data from EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2016 report that’s scheduled for full release in July.

The main takeaway from EIA’s “sneak preview” is the importance of the U.S. energy revolution – primarily oil and natural gas developed from shale and other tight-rock formations using safe hydraulic fracturing and modern horizontal drilling. The United States is stronger now and will be in the future thanks to domestic energy from fracking.

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Methane Regulation and Risking Emissions Progress

natural gas production  epa regulation  methane  emssions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 12, 2016

We’ll say it again: Methane emissions are falling. And they’ll continue doing so because industry wants to capture as much of the primary component of natural gas as possible, for delivery to consumers.

So that’s the context for EPA’s regulatory initiative. Basically, the agency looked at the energy landscape – one of surging production but also declining emissions – and determined the next step should be more regulation. The resulting new rules could hinder America’s shale energy revolution, one that has helped lower U.S. energy-related carbon emissions 12 percent below 2005 levels, allowing the United States to lead the world in reducing carbon emissions.

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