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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Stricter Ozone Rule = Nonattainment for Arkansas

ozone  ozone standards  economic impacts  arkansas  epa  emissions  jobs  Economy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 22, 2014

The national standard for ground-level ozone hardly needs tinkering. As noted  earlier this year by Howard Feldman, API’s director of scientific and regulatory affairs, air quality in the U.S. has been steadily improving in recent years, and the health case for a more stringent ozone standard, which EPA may propose, hasn’t been made:

“We recognize that EPA has a statutory duty to periodically review the standards. However, the current review of health studies has not identified compelling evidence for more stringent standards. Tightened standards could impose unachievable emission reduction requirements on virtually every part of the nation, including rural and undeveloped areas. These could be the costliest EPA regulations ever.”

Costly nationally and to the states individually. A report for the National Association of Manufacturers says the U.S. could see a $270 billion per year reduction in GDP and 2.9 million fewer job equivalents per year on average through 2040. We’ve looked at potential state impacts in North CarolinaOhioLouisianaKentucky and Michigan. Today, Arkansas:

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American Oil and Natural Gas: Crushing it

american energy  Economy  jobs  pennsylvania  exports  gulf leases  gulf  refinery  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 21, 2014

Wall Street Journal: U.S. economic growth accelerated in the second half of 2013 before unexpectedly contracting early this year. But growth late last year was uneven across the nation, with some energy-rich states leading the pack while economies slowed in New England and on the Plains.

 

That’s according to new data released Wednesday by the Commerce Department. The agency already reported gross domestic product for the nation on a quarterly basis and at the state level annuallyNow, it has offered a quarterly breakdown for state-level GDP data through the end of 2013. The data are volatile from quarter to quarter, but allow a finer understanding of the ups and downs in regional economies.

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U.S. Energy: For Jobs, and Opportunity

american energy  jobs  Economy  virginia  ohio  louisiana  north dakota  e15 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 19, 2014

Daily Press (Newport News, Va.) Editorial: With thoughtful planning and focused leadership, Virginia could be a titan of production and one the most important states for energy on the East Coast. Our natural resources have the commonwealth poised to be a national leader in energy, and properly utilizing them could create thousands of jobs and generate billions in revenue.

It is challenging to strike a balance between traditional energy sources, such as coal, oil and natural gas, and emerging renewables like wind and biomass. The Virginia Energy Plan, updated every four years by the Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy, serves as a guide.

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Big Ethanol’s E10 Giveaway

ethanol  renewable fuel standard  e10  e15  Economy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 15, 2014

Helmets off – as in motorcycle helmets – to the Renewable Fuel Association (RFA) for conducting an E10 fuel giveaway at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally earlier this month in South Dakota.

We know Big Ethanol prefers ethanol in stronger doses than E10 (up to 10 percent content), but RFA must realize its efforts to get more of the higher ethanol-blend E15 into the nation’s fuel supply has risks with certain audiences.

Take motorcycle enthusiasts. The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) has been direct in its concerns about E15 in the fuel marketplace:

Inadvertent misfueling with E15 (15 percent ethanol by volume) fuel is a significant concern to AMA members. E15 use can void manufacturers’ warranties, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has acknowledged that E15 can damage engines. Although the EPA has approved its use in 2001-and-newer light-duty vehicles – which include cars, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles – the EPA has not approved its use in the estimated 22 million motorcycles and ATVs currently in operation. … Preventing these inadvertent misfuelings has been one of the AMA’s main concerns, because a vast majority of motorcycles and ATVs on the road and trail in the United States today are not designed to run on ethanol blends higher than 10 percent. And many older machines favored by vintage motorcycle enthusiasts have problems with any ethanol in the fuel.

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For Jobs, Energy Security, the Economy - More North American Energy

Energy Security  jobs  Economy  keystone xl pipeline  oil sands  fracking  north dakota 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 15, 2014

Forbes: The U.S. arm of the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) has been making news this week with a ‘new’ report claiming the Obama Administration drastically underestimated carbon emissions of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.  The report seeks to make the case as to why the final portion of the Keystone pipeline system should not be built.

As tantalizing as the report sounds, supporters of the pipeline have been quick to point out the report is actually a recycled 2013 SEI report which the State Department took into account, and largely dismissed.

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The Promise of American Energy, Today and Tomorrow

american energy  global markets  fracking  Economy  jobs  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 13, 2014

Bloomberg Businessweek: Fighting across Iraq, Libya, Ukraine and Gaza, and an accelerating economy, should mean higher oil prices. Yet crude is falling.

Six years ago, oil soared to a record $147 a barrel as tension mounted over Iran’s nuclear program and the world economy had just seen the strongest period of sustained growth since the 1970s. Now, West Texas Intermediate, the U.S. benchmark price, has traded below $100 for 10 days and Brent, the European equivalent, tumbled to a 13-month low.

What’s changed is the shale fracking boom. The U.S. is pumping the most oil in 27 years, adding more than 3 million barrels of daily supply since 2008. The International Energy Agency said yesterday that a supply glut is shielding the market from disruptions. Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc. and BNP Paribas SA concur. 

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Choosing Jobs, Energy Security, American Energy

Economy  Energy Security  jobs  american energy  fracking  ohio  pennsylvania 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 11, 2014

The Daily Signal: There’s been something of an energy boom taking place in the U.S. over the past few years, and it’s given the American economy a real boost. Now we just need the federal government to get out of the way and open opportunities to freely trade energy, and those benefits will grow substantially.

U.S. coal exports over the past six years are way up, in large part because of the administration’s effort to limit consumption domestically. Domestic production of oil and natural gas is rising fast as well, with producers seeking to export their products to foreign markets.

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U.S. Energy – for Jobs, Economic Growth, Security

Energy Security  Economy  jobs  american energy  fracking  marcellus  lng exports  colorado  texas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 8, 2014

Penn Live (Brian Hollister): I was retired at age 49. After service in the military and a career as an Electronic Quality Engineer, I was pleased to be working independently at what I enjoy most, small construction projects. I was living comfortably while doing work for friends and community members.

But then came the economic collapse of 2008, and like so many Americans, my fortune - quite literally - changed. Overnight I lost much of what I'd saved for my future and I needed to return to work. It's a familiar story. After time away, the job market I found was quite different from the one I'd left behind.

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American Energy is Changing the Global Markets

american energy  trade  global markets  exports  fracking  Economy  Energy Security 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 7, 2014

The Christian Science Monitor: WASHINGTON — An oil and gas boom helped drive the US trade deficit to a five-month low in June, according to federal data released Wednesday.

Increased domestic energy production means Americans are buying less foreign oil and gas, and selling more of it overseas. That has tamped down the trade deficit in recent years, helping along an economy that continues to recover from the Great Recession.

Some say the deficit could be slashed further if the US were to ease energy export restrictions put in place to protect US consumers from global energy shocks. But such a move would have impacts that go beyond the country’s balance of trade. Critics of oil and gas exports say they will raise energy prices at home, and increase the environmental impacts of extracting and burning fossil fuels.

Either way, a renaissance in oil and gas production is already changing the way officials, analysts, and economists look at the future of the US economy.

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Empowering, Sustaining America’s Energy Revolution

Economy  Energy Security  jobs  american energy  fracking  lng exports  colorado 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 6, 2014

The Hill (Toby Mack): America , along with its oil and gas producers, energy supply chain companies, and millions of American workers, are quite literally "missing the boat" as a result of the federal government-imposed ban on crude oil exports, and severe limits on liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports. Eliminating these restrictions would set the stage for dramatically more rapid growth in energy production and for the supply chain businesses that support energy operations.

Applications to export as much as 25 billion cubic feet per day (bcf/d) equivalent of natural gas are stuck in the Department of Energy's limbo of lengthy review processes.  Recently released studies and analysis indicate that each additional 10 bcf/d of natural gas produced to meet export demand would create 110,000 new jobs and $20 billion annually of new business for the energy supply chain - construction contractors, equipment companies, materials suppliers and production service providers. And with other nations rushing to fill the void left by the absence of U.S. exports, this window of opportunity will close and the business lost if we don't accelerate processing of these applications.

On the crude oil front, research firm IHS Energy conservatively projects that enabling exports would cause U.S. production to increase by an average of 1.2 million barrels per day by 2016, which would result in an additional $86 billion of GDP per year. With models showing about half of production-related output being created by the energy supply chain, this yields approximately $40 billion more per year in potential business for supply chain companies, with about another 200,000 new jobs.

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