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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Metro Economies Ride Energy Renaissance

manufacturing  oil and natural gas jobs  oil and natural gas development  hydraulic fracturing  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 20, 2014

A new study conducted for the U.S. Conference of Mayors underscores the significant economic link between America’s energy renaissance and a surge in U.S. manufacturing job creation and business activity. Some of the key findings in the IHS Global Insight study:

  • Abundant supplies of natural gas and oil lowered costs and increased refining volumes, resulting in a surge in plastic, rubber, resin and chemical manufacturing. These industries saw a combined employment increase of 2.6 percent across all metropolitan areas (2011-2012).
  • Energy-intensive manufacturing added more than 196,000 jobs and increased real sales by $124 billion in the nation’s metro areas from 2010-2012.
  • Energy-intensive manufacturing will expand by more than 1 percent annually nationwide through 2020, with 72 percent of those jobs going to U.S. metro areas.

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Keystone XL to Natural Gas: American Energy is Changing the Global Market

american energy  Energy Security  Economy  jobs  fracking  keystone xl pipeline  global markets 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 19, 2014

Carpe Diem Blog: US petroleum exports reached a new record high in 2013 at an average of more than 3.5 million barrels per day (bpd), which was almost double the 1.8 million bpd of petroleum exports in 2008. During his State of the Union address in January of 2010, President Obama promised that his administration would double US exports within five years. It’s becoming increasingly clear that it’s a completely unachievable goal, except for a few exceptions like petroleum products. But I don’t think we’ll be hearing about the doubling of petroleum exports from Team Obama. Fossil fuel based exports were probably the furthest thing from his mind when Obama made the fantasy promise to double America’s exports within five years.

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Happy Birthday, Fracking!

fracking  american energy  Economy  Environment  Energy Security  Energy Efficiency  jobs  hydraulic fracturing  innovation  technology 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 17, 2014

Happy birthday, fracking! What a fantastic, 65-year ride it has been – and here’s to another 65 years and more.

Advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling launched an oil and natural gas renaissance in this country – bringing dynamic job creation, economic stimulus that radiates well beyond the oil and natural gas industry proper and greater energy security. Thanks to fracking, the United States is an energy superpower that, with the right policies, can harness its vast resources to ensure a significantly better future for its citizens while reducing energy-related tension across the globe.

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Talking Energy and Opportunity

job creation  job security  economic benefits  oil and natural gas jobs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 12, 2014

I had an interesting – and very timely – conversation with the first group of API Fellows last week at IHS CERA’s mega-energy conference in Houston. Interesting – because these highly motivated men and women surely will be part of the next generation of industry leaders Timely, because a new IHS study projects great industry opportunities in the future for minorities and women.

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Jobs and Opportunity in Energy

job creation  oil and natural gas jobs  oil and gas industry  american energy  petroleum products 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 10, 2014

A new report on the employment outlook for minorities and women in the oil and natural gas and petrochemical industries can be summed up in two words: tremendous opportunity. The study by consulting firm IHS projects that minorities will fill one-third of jobs in these industries by 2030 – up from one-quarter in 2010.

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No Debating the Benefits of Fracking

shale energy  shale jobs  oil and natural gas development  ghg emission reduction  fracking  hydraulic fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 28, 2014

The scope of shale energy’s benefits and their impact on the United States – jobs, economic stimulus and increased energy security – seems ever-expanding.  Speakers at Bloomberg’s “Energy 2020” event described energy reserves large enough and technologies so advanced that Americans can contemplate a far friendlier future than would have been possible just a few years ago.

GE Chairman and CEO Jeffrey Immelt:

“A lot is taking place in natural gas. People historically have viewed this as a transition fuel. Now it’s becoming more of a baseload fuel. There’s more supply diversity, it’s viewed incrementally as cleaner and an interim solution to environmental issues. We see that taking place.”

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The Energy to Create Jobs

natural gas from shale  shale jobs  shale energy  manufacturing  hydraulic fracturing  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 28, 2014

The folks at Energy In Depth have a great video out that captures the key role natural gas is playing in the regeneration of U.S. manufacturing. 

It’s fairly simple: Because of available, affordable natural gas U.S. manufacturers are finding it more economical to conduct operations right here at home – producing more, hiring more, contributing more to the economy. As the video depicts, natural gas will help support more than 500,000 new U.S. manufacturing jobs by 2020.


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Innovations are Fueling American Energy, Growth in Manufacturing

innovation  manufacturing  jobs  Economy  fracking  american energy  global energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 25, 2014

American Shale Gas and Tight Oil: Reshaping the Global Energy Balance

IHS Unconventional Energy Blog: The development of shale gas and tight oil in the United States constitutes an “unconventional revolution,” owing to its scale and speed. It is already having a profound global impact: upending energy markets, reshaping competitiveness in the world economy, and portending major shifts in global politics.

The unconventional revolution was born out of advances in two technologies. Hydraulic fracturing — or “fracking” — was introduced at the end of the 1940s. Efforts to apply this technique to dense shale in Texas began in the early 1980s. But it took two decades to perfect the combination of fracking and horizontal drilling that would drive the new boom. And it wasn’t until 2008 that these techniques began to have a major impact.

Since then, however, growth has been remarkable. Shale gas currently accounts for nearly half of U.S. natural gas production, and U.S. prices have fallen to one third of European levels and one-fifth of Asian levels. Tight oil, produced with the same techniques as shale gas, has led to a 60 percent rise in U.S. oil production since 2008. This increase of three million barrels per day is larger than the national output of nine of the 13 OPEC countries. The International Energy Agency predicts that the U.S. will soon overtake Saudi Arabia and Russia as the world’s largest oil producer.

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Shale Energy’s Broad, Beneficial Impacts

trade  Economy  jobs  education  manufacturing  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 24, 2014

Energy Trade is a Key Part of Overall U.S. Trade Flows

EIA Energy Today: Energy trade has long been a key component of overall U.S. trade flows. Recent developments in U.S. energy production, notably the rapid growth of tight oil and shale gas output, are leading to significant changes in the nation's energy trade flows. Another important factor is consumption trends, which reflect both increased efficiency of vehicles and other energy-using equipment, and structural changes in the economy. This article, which focuses on current energy trade in the context of overall trade flows, will be followed by several others in the coming days that consider the evolution of trade flows in major energy fuel categories since 2002.

 

As shown in the figure above, overall U.S. trade includes both goods and services but is dominated by goods. In 2013, as in other recent years, the United States was a net importer of goods and a net exporter of services. Energy accounted for 15% of gross U.S. goods imports in 2013, while energy exports, which have grown significantly in recent years, accounted for 7% of overall U.S. goods exports. Focusing on the net U.S. trade position, shown by the black line in the chart above, net energy imports account for nearly half of the total U.S. trade deficit in goods and services.

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The Broad Benefits of Surging U.S. Energy

american energy  Economy  jobs  Energy Security  Environment  global markets  lng exports  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 21, 2014

Well-Being in America: Shale Gas Buys You Happiness

The Economist: Based on interviews with more than 178,000 people from all 50 states, the Well-Being Index offers an interesting glimpse of the physical and mental health of the nation. It also spotlights the country's winners and losers. The results divide regionally, with Midwestern and Western states earning nine of the ten best scores in 2013, while Southern states have eight of the ten lowest. Massachusetts has the highest rate of residents with health insurance (which may bode well for Obamacare). Colorado, meanwhile, nearly always has the lowest obesity rate. 

Sitting pretty in first place now is North Dakota, which has displaced Hawaii as the state where people are most likely to be healthy and feel good about their life and work. North Dakota’s speedy climb to first place from 19 last year seems to have a lot to do with the shale-gas boom, which has buoyed the state with lots of new jobs and money. This bonanza has apparently trickled into South Dakota, which has elbowed aside Colorado to secure second place.

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