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Energy Tomorrow Blog

American Energy Leads

american energy  Economy  jobs  growth  infrastructure  texas  exports  fracking  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 9, 2015

CNN Money: In October 2011, my colleague Blake Ellis and I traveled to western North Dakota to report on the accelerating oil boom. A lot has changed since then.

In oil towns like Williston and Watford City, massive amounts of infrastructure have been built in just the last three years. Here's a look at some of the bigger projects:

 

People: Populations in once-small towns soared as people from around the country (and the world) migrated to the area for jobs. Williston Mayor Howard Klug says that the city of under 15,000 in the 2010 census now has a "serviceable population of 60,000 to 70,000."

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Nothing Spooky About U.S. Energy's Jobs, Strengthened Security

keystone xl  pipeline construction  oil production  shale energy  alaska  texas  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 31, 2014

Fox News:Why is the White House Delaying the Keystone XL Decision?

Read more: http://bit.ly/1pbMGbR

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A Vote for American Energy = A Vote for Jobs, A Better U.S. Economy

Economy  jobs  american energy  crude oil  exports  colorado  texas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 14, 2014

Huffington Post (Aspen Institute’s Thomas Duesterberg): The largely unanticipated boom in oil production in the last five years has revived a debate over whether the United States should reverse the forty-year old ban on exports of crude oil. Even though we still import around 30 percent of total crude and refined products, the U.S. refinery industry is unable to process much of the new supply of light crude oil produced from domestic light shale formations. In turn, domestic prices for light oil lag the world price and eventually could result in reduced levels of new production. Allowing exports would likely equalize domestic and world prices and also lead to more efficient global processing because many refineries abroad, especially in Europe, can do a better job than their U.S. counterparts. The United States would continue to import heavier grades of crude oil which its refineries are built to process.

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Energy Benefits: More American Jobs, Economic Growth, Security

Economy  jobs  Energy Security  american energy  exports  fracking  marcellus  texas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 9, 2014

Platts: US gasoline prices will fall 9-12 cents/gal and prices elsewhere in the world will fall 10-13 cents/gal if current US restrictions on oil exports are dropped next year, a leading Washington think-tank said Tuesday.

"The more the US exports crude oil, the greater decline in gasoline prices," the study from The Brookings Institution's Energy Security Initiative claimed. "As counterintuitive as it may seem, lifting the ban actually lowers gasoline prices by increasing the total amount of crude supply, albeit by only a modest amount."

Brookings' finding are nearly identical to those of a May study from energy consultancy IHS which concluded that free trade of crude would cause US gasoline prices to fall 8-12 cents/gal due to the close link between gasoline and world oil prices.

Like IHS, the Brookings study claimed the impact of crude exports on gasoline prices dulls over time, falling from a 9-12 cent/gal drop in 2015 to 0-10 cents/gal by 2025.

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American Energy Impacts Global Markets, Makes U.S. More Secure

north dakota  texas  economic benefits  oil and natural gas development 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 27, 2014

USAToday Editorial: There is much news these days from the world's major energy producing regions. Almost none of it is good.

Iraq, Libya and Syria are in turmoil. Russia, the world's largest exporter of natural gas and the second largest exporter of oil, is bullying Ukraine and by extension Western Europe. And Iran's nuclear program may yet provoke a market-roiling conflict.

Amazingly, as all this has transpired, U.S. gasoline prices have been stable, even falling. The domestic economy is picking up steam. And the stock market has hit all-time highs.

Go figure. Perhaps the markets are in denial and Americans are in for an ugly surprise. They were blindsided in 1973 when an Arab oil boycott led to higher prices and long gas lines, and again in 1979 when the Iranian revolution led to a second oil shock.

But there are legitimate reasons why things would look relatively good here while so much of the world burns. First among them is a U.S. energy renaissance that has left the nation far less dependent on Mideast oil.

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America’s Energy Revolution: Positive, Not Partisan

policy  politics  fracking  pennsylvania  ohio  texas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 26, 2014

Times Online (Pennsylvania): Matt Curry moved to Texas for work but kept his treasured Steelers season tickets in the hope he might return someday to western Pennsylvania.

After graduating from Penn State with a degree in petroleum engineering, Curry didn't have much of a choice but to leave. He got a job that required him to travel and "bounced around the United States for a few years," the 43-year-old said recently.

"I eventually settled in Dallas, working for multiple oil and gas companies during my time there," he said. "Around 2008, I began hearing more and more about Marcellus and Range Resources, and I saw the opportunity to move home."

Curry is director of business development at Range Resources in Cecil Township, Washington County. He and his wife, Heather, have three children, ranging in age from 4 months to 5 years old -- "all born in Pittsburgh," said Curry, who is from Lower Burrell, Westmoreland County.

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Milestones for American Energy – and Potential Obstacles

american energy  epa  ozone standards  fracking  texas  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 14, 2014

Wall Street Journal (Jay Timmons, NAM): In a town famous for inaction, Washington is gearing up to take action on a major policy issue. But there's a hitch: The outcome could be the most expensive regulation in the nation's history, possibly tanking the economy and costing jobs at a time when businesses, manufacturers and families are making a comeback.

Later this year, the Environmental Protection Agency will decide whether it should tighten the air-quality standard for ground-level ozone. There are several things about this possible new standard that are alarming.

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U.S. Energy – for Jobs, Economic Growth, Security

Energy Security  Economy  jobs  american energy  fracking  marcellus  lng exports  colorado  texas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 8, 2014

Penn Live (Brian Hollister): I was retired at age 49. After service in the military and a career as an Electronic Quality Engineer, I was pleased to be working independently at what I enjoy most, small construction projects. I was living comfortably while doing work for friends and community members.

But then came the economic collapse of 2008, and like so many Americans, my fortune - quite literally - changed. Overnight I lost much of what I'd saved for my future and I needed to return to work. It's a familiar story. After time away, the job market I found was quite different from the one I'd left behind.

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More American Energy is a Win-Win for the Economy, Workers, U.S. Competitiveness

Economy  jobs  american energy  fracking  lng exports  texas  marcellus 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 1, 2014

Wall Street Journal (Merrill Matthews Opinion): The growing efforts by state and local governments to stop hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," to extract natural gas could end up in the Supreme Court. These efforts may unconstitutionally limit property owners' ability to profit from their mineral rights.

More than 170 New York towns and cities have used zoning laws to restrict or prohibit fracking, and in June New York's Supreme Court turned back a challenge to this practice. Pennsylvania allows local municipalities to restrict fracking. Colorado and California are struggling with the issue.

Even in pro-energy Texas, the relatively small town of Denton, about 30 miles north of Dallas, has a fracking moratorium while the city considers whether to impose a permanent ban. At a recent contentious Denton city council meeting in which 500 people attended, the council moved to let voters decide in November.

Nevertheless, landowners and drillers are threatening to sue Denton if a ban is implemented. They may have a case.

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Boosting Energy Security, Economy with American Energy

Energy Security  Economy  jobs  american energy  exports  lng exports  engineers  pennsylvania  texas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted July 31, 2014

Houston Chronicle (Editorial): Fracking is more effective than bullets when it comes to containing Russian President Vladimir Putin's Soviet-era ambitions.

 

Empowered by oil funds and a gas pipeline yoke on Europe, Putin has resuscitated a Cold War ethos of nationalism and expansionism. Yet after the invasion of Crimea and Russian militias seizing sections of eastern Ukraine, it seemed as if Europe's red line was located somewhere a few miles east of the Brandenburg Gate. It took the attack on Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 to finally shock Europe back to reality, where Russia stands as a legitimate threat to a peaceful continent.

 

These aggressive moves have gained Russia few friends, but as Tsar Alexander III once said, Russia's only allies are its army and its navy. For the 21st century, pipelines should be added to that list. And that is where the United States must focus containment efforts.

 

Our allies are far too reliant on Russian pipelines to truly oppose Putin's aggression - there's a reason why the new technology sanctions against Russia don't apply to natural gas.

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