Skip to main content

Energy Tomorrow Blog

In Power Generation, Natural Gas Defines Reliability

natural gas  consumers  electric-grid  ferc 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 4, 2017

Some initial takeaways from this week’s House hearing, during which there was considerable discussion of the U.S. Energy Department’s recent request that a new electricity pricing program be developed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission – one that effectively would favor some energy sources over others.

First, as we argued twice last week (read here and here), markets – not preferences, mechanisms, subsidies or whatever – should be allowed to select energy sources for power generation, because they reward innovation, promote efficiency, lower prices and work to benefit consumers.

More »

Natural Gas Abundance and LNG Exports

lng exports  natural gas  consumers  economic growth  jobs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 3, 2017

Here’s what we’ve learned since a 2013 study projected job and economic gains from exporting U.S. liquefied natural gas: The jobs and economic growth are still positive and significant, the domestic price impacts are about half of what was estimated four years ago and we have more natural gas than we thought.

More »

Let Markets Choose, Part 2

consumers  natural gas  electric-grid  ferc 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 29, 2017

Earlier this week we wrote about the market perils of government efforts to favor some energy sources over others (“On Energy, Let Markets Choose”). We may as well have been talking about Friday’s U.S. Energy Department request that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) develop a new electricity pricing program that lets some power plants recover the costs of providing that power.

Whatever you call these preferential measures – subsidies, mechanisms, credits – they tend to foil the way markets, if left to themselves, reward innovation, promote efficiency, lower prices and work to benefit consumers.

More »

On Energy, Let Markets Choose

natural gas benefits  consumers  natural gas supplies  nuclear  subsidies 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 26, 2017

We support all-of-the-above energy – the concept that America is strongest and its citizens are best served when all of our country’s energy sources play their part. We’re also for the important role markets play in determining energy sources, because markets reward innovation, spur efficiency, lower prices and work to benefit consumers. That said, a new study that basically argues market-distorting subsidies enjoyed by some energies should be followed by market-distorting subsidies for others makes little sense.

More »

Bill Would Help Strengthen U.S. Energy Infrastructure

natural gas pipelines  environmental review  consumers  natural gas benefits  natural gas access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 21, 2017

For a number of months we’ve been talking about the need for more efficient and predictable federal processes for the permitting of energy infrastructure – including new natural gas pipelines and added capacity. New, bipartisan legislation introduced this week in the U.S. Senate is latest move in that direction.

More »

New Jerseyans Right to Reject Nuclear Subsidies

natural gas benefits  new jersey  consumers  nuclear 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 19, 2017

Looking at the benefits of natural gas in a state such as New Jersey – lower consumer costs, jobs, environmental progress – it makes no sense to risk what works for New Jerseyans by handing state subsidies to nuclear plants. New Jersey voters agree: A strong, bipartisan majority opposes the idea in a new poll.

More »

Hurricane Update: Focusing on Fuel Supplies Before Irma Arrives

hurricane response  florida  fuel supply  consumers  hurricane-harvey  hurricane-irma 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 7, 2017

As the Texas-Louisiana region continues its recovery from Hurricane Harvey, energy companies are making preparations for Hurricane Irma, which the National Hurricane Center projects could make landfall in Florida on Sunday. The big issue in Florida is consumer access to fuel. Companies are working with state and federal officials to meet needs.

More »

Harvey Update: Price Impacts and the Need for Patience, Consideration

hurricane response  consumers  gasoline supply  refineries  hurricane-harvey  oil supply 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 6, 2017

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports on rising gasoline prices in the wake of Hurricane Harvey and notes that the storm’s impact on prices is similar to the big hurricanes of 2005, Katrina and Rita. … EIA’s report underscores a number of points we’ve been making about the oil supply chain, of which the Texas-Louisiana region is part – especially the section of that chain that shows the path of refined products from refineries to retail outlets – and the need for patience as processes come back online.

More »

Harvey Update: Supply, Demand and Gasoline Markets

hurricane response  hurricane-harvey  gasoline supply  consumers  refineries 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 5, 2017

Before then-Hurricane Harvey first made landfall, we discussed how mega-weather events historically have impacted the regional/national oil supply chain and supply levels in the marketplace. The uncertain path of Hurricane Irma will drive continued conversation about storm effects on refineries and other energy infrastructure and the potential for market impacts around the country. That’s the context for some basics about the fuel marketplace and the processes that bring finished consumer products from refineries to retail outlets.

More »

Infrastructure, Jobs and Economic Growth

pipelines  infrastructure  consumers  economic growth  jobs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 15, 2017

We’ve posted quite a bit recently about the need for streamlining the federal permitting process for energy infrastructure (see here and here).  An API study earlier this year estimated investments in needed natural gas and oil infrastructure could total more than a trillion dollars and potentially generate more than 1 million jobs through 2035. That’s a lot of economic potential linked to infrastructure – and in that context, President Trump’s new executive order modernizing and bringing greater accountability to the federal permitting process certainly is welcome. It coincides with release of a new study, for North America’s Building Trades Unions (NABTU), detailing the jobs and economic impacts of energy infrastructure construction.

More »