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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Minnesota: Energy to Explore 10,000 Lakes (Or More)

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 12, 2017

Beaches seem to get all the glory during the summer. Consider how often you see depictions of a sunbaked shoreline, a crowded beach, people in sunglasses and bathing suits swatting volleyballs, tossing Frisbees and otherwise frolicking in or near water. Sounds great, yet the 61 percent of Americans who don’t live in counties directly on the shoreline are more likely to enjoy summertime sun, sand and water at a lake.

Nobody does lakes quite like Minnesota – you know, the “Land of 10,000 Lakes” (actually 11,842, but that’s not as snappy on a license plate). While Alaska has more lakes, Minnesota really is synonymous with the summer lake life: relaxing weekends, hopping on a jet ski and zooming off with friends or pulling out the kayaks and navigating the back channels. Energy makes these happen and makes them more enjoyable – as it does so many of the hobbies, activities and travels of summer.

Manufacturers like Polaris and Arctic Cat, both headquartered in Minnesota, juice up their jet skis with impressive engines and sleek bodies that cut through the water while the needle climbs on the speedometer. These high-end personal water craft are a complete-package energy product. Their bodies typically are shaped from fiberglass, an amalgamation of glass fibers that usually is formed using natural gas. And don’t forget to fill up that gas tank and check your engine’s oil before you head out for a long day on the water!

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Montana: Fly Fishing and the Energy That Runs Through It

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 10, 2017

Dawn breaks on a summer morning along Montana’s Blackfoot River. A group of veteran fly-fishing anglers finds a good spot to start their day and watches as the rising sun sparkles on the easy-moving water. Taking in the stillness around them, they spot an elk drinking from the other side and begin connecting flies to lines at the end of graphite rods.

It’s truly a scene right out of the film, “A River Runs Through It.” And while the Blackfoot’s rocks might not have cryptic messages secreted under them, the thrilling anticipation for fly fishing at daybreak, felt by Norman and Paul Maclean in the movie, is palpable. Indeed, fly fishing enthusiasts in Montana and across the country hunger for the experience year after year. Energy makes a sport nearly as old as Montana’s craggy mountain peaks a modern-day source of idyllic joy. It’s what energy does: More than just serving as fuels, natural gas and oil improve the experiences of so many of the summer things we enjoy.

Fly fishing demands a lot of skill, as well as learning how to master its specialized equipment. You don’t just stagger into a Montana river or stream and start pulling in succulent trout. Yet, thanks to natural gas and oil, the equipment itself is strong and reliable.

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California: Energy and the Art of Hanging Ten

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 7, 2017

Ever since the early 1960s, when Jan and Dean and the Beach Boys popularized the “California Sound” and surf music, the union of surfing and sunny Southern California has been “epic,” “cranking,” “radical” – all surfing shorthand for awesome. You can surf in other states, but it’s hard to beat Cali for catchin’ a wave and sitting on top of the world.   

Energy makes wave-catching “epic.”

Sure, surfing is riding high on the waves, the sun glinting in your eyes and the briny smell of the ocean in your nostrils. It’s also that surfboard under your feet, which is where energy comes in. Whether you choose a shortboard, funboard or go with an old-school longboard, energy keeps you cruising on the crest of the Pacific Ocean’s chilly blue water.

While the ancient Polynesians and then Hawaiians used wooden surfboards for their sport, since the 1950s most surfboards have been made using layers of petroleum-based products to create durable, light and buoyant boards.

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South Carolina: Energy and the National Drink of Summer

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 5, 2017

It’s summertime, and the living is easy in South Carolina. This time of year it’s hard to beat a little bit of porch-sitting and sweet-tea sipping. A little whisper of a breeze and a cool drink feel pretty good as the temperatures rise and the air thickens. The living is as easy as parking yourself in a rocker, a hammock or a porch swing – with a pitcher of sweet tea nearby.

Iced tea is the national drink of summer. About 80 percent of the 3.8 billion gallons of tea consumed in the U.S. in 2016 was iced, according to the Tea Association of the U.S.A. In South Carolina it must be sweet tea. Unsweetened tea is what Brits drink hot and Yankees drink cold. (And neither of those affinities is held in much regard in Savannah or Charleston.) However you like your tea, energy figures prominently in the mix. Natural gas and oil help nearly every step along the way, from drying the tea leaves, to packaging the tea bags to the manufacture of sweet tea jugs. Making things better – it’s what modern, versatile energy goes.

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Mississippi: Plying America’s Greatest River Highway, With Energy

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 3, 2017

When Huck Finn and Jim floated down the Mississippi on their river raft, the waters around them swirled and frothed in the wake of massive, wedding cake-tiered riverboats, their paddle wheels churning the “Big Muddy” while tall, fluted stacks belched sparks and clouds of black smoke.

The golden era of riverboat transportation is gone, yet along the state of Mississippi’s western boundary, marked by its river namesake for some 350 miles, descendants of those proud, historic river belles still ply Ol Man River.

With names that include the Steamboat Natchez, American Queen, Queen of the Mississippi and American Duchess, the current incarnations of the boats that were familiar to Mark Twain evoke some nostalgia for a different era – while deploying modern energy to paddle up and down waterways safely, more efficiently and more comfortably for today’s passengers.

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North Carolina: Stock Car Racing and the Energy to Roar

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 30, 2017

Ah, NASCAR and North Carolina. They’re like a fantastic couple on a fine summer day: close, warm and comfortable. Their easy relationship surely reflects stock car racing’s deep roots in the Tar Heel State – based on innovation and energy-driven technologies, resulting in pure, heart-pounding excitement. Energy makes it so – in the materials, components, fuels and more that thrill racing fans all across the country.

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Texas: Energy is Taking U.S. to the Frontiers of Space

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 28, 2017

A recognized piece of American pop culture, Capt. James T. Kirk’s dog-eared quotation actually stands up pretty well as a rallying cry for space exploration and the U.S. space program in general. Somewhere, Mr. Spock raises an eyebrow and nods.

Folks at NASA probably would applaud. On a hot, summer day in Houston, parents drop off their children at the space agency’s Johnson Space Center for a day-camp filled with STEM activities and awe-inspiring sights. Who knows, the next John Glenn might be one of the kids goofing off as the campers venture into one of the center’s newest attractions.

The Mission Mars exhibit features Orion, NASA’s Mars-bound spacecraft that one day, NASA says, will “take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before.” Echoes of Capt. Kirk. Campers get to touch fabricated Martian rocks, view a Martian sunset and learn how Orion’s 33.9 million-mile journey is possible. From the propellants fueling the shuttle to the petroleum-based materials in Orion’s landing parachute, energy will take us to the planets and bring us home again.

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Arizona: Longer, Straighter, Greener Golf – Thanks to Energy

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 26, 2017

Folks play golf year-round in Arizona. That’s an option when your state capital/largest city can be found in the “Valley of the Sun,” right? Warm temps … sunshine … just add water – for greens so immaculately manicured you could shoot a game of pool on them, and soft, rolling fairways that cradle a long, straight drive, setting up an easy chip to the pin – or, if you’re Jordan Spieth, a bunker shot that you hole out to win the Travelers Championship playoff.

Here’s the scoop: If you like golf, you must like energy. Natural gas and oil help make today’s golf a game of leveraged power – enjoyed on exquisite courses and made enjoyable by energy, from well-fertilized courses to equipment crafted with space-age materials. Natural gas and oil make a good game even better.

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Oklahoma: Energy and Freedom on Historic Route 66

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 23, 2017

It’s a day and a half into an old-fashioned driving vacation on historic Route 66. Oklahoma is just over the next hill, about a third of the way along the highway’s 2,400 miles. The road ahead is clear, the Ford Mustang is humming – and with Tom Petty wailing “Free Fallin’” over the car’s sound system – it’s a little like a scene from “Jerry Maguire.” Freedom on the open road.

Well, mostly freedom. Within view of the Oklahoma state line, the car’s fuel indicator winks on. The Mustang’s getting thirsty. No problem. Billboards rising over gently rolling, brown landscape point to gas stations just inside the Sooner State – at Quapaw and also Commerce, Mickey Mantle’s boyhood home.

You pick Commerce, a nod to “The Mick’s” memory. While the Mustang quenches its thirst, you scan a state map, looking for attractions along 66’s storied route.

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Kansas: Wheat, Energy and Our Daily Bread

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 21, 2017

On a clear June morning in Kansas, a farmer inspects his hard red winter wheat crop and notes that it has turned from green to a shade of gold. He takes a bite out of a kernel to test for hardness, and then he knows his crop is ready to harvest and turn into flour at the nearby mill. He climbs into his combine and works quickly to cut the stock and separate and crush the grain before the next rain comes.

Often weighing more than 40,000 pounds, the combine is the most important piece of equipment at a wheat farmer’s disposal. The large, gasoline/diesel-powered machine, manufactured by companies including John Deere and International Harvester, efficiently cuts the wheat and threshes it, separating the kernels of grain and discarding the leftover straw. Like so many aspects of modern life, harvesting the wheat that goes into our daily bread and many other food products is an energy process.

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